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Henry ate children in 1903 and was sentenced to a life of captivity. This week he turned 114


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Henry the crocodile was captured in 1903 for eating several children from a tribe in the Okavango Delta of Botswana. Instead of killing the crocodile the tribe elders decided to condemn the reptile to a lifetime of captivity. But what they probably didn't expect was that the crocodile would outlive them all.

 

Henry, who today lives at the Crocworld Conservation Center (CCC) in Scottburgh (a coastal town south of Durban), celebrated his 114th birthday this week.

 

“We have invited all of Henry’s 6 wives to his 114th birthday party,” said the center to BNO News.

 

Crocodiles have an average lifespan of 70 years, so if Henry is lucky he might be around a couple of more years. “These days, Henry has a pretty wonderful life at the Center with his six wives,” Crocworld said.

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