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Simon Leufstedt

What do you do to fight global warming?

What do you do?  

  1. 1.

    • I recycle all my waste.
      3
    • I use the public transportation system on daily basis.
      3
    • I walk or take the bike whenever I can.
      2
    • I shop for the most energy efficient electronics and appliances.
      1
    • I shut off my equipment and lights whenever I'm not using them.
      5
    • I have changed my lightbulbs to (CFLs) low energy efficent lightbulbs.
      4
    • I have lowered the termostate in my house.
      0
    • I am telling everyone about global warming and how people can fight it.
      3
    • I use a "green" web host.
      2
    • I don't take long and hot showers.
      3
    • I support and buy energy from renewable energy sources.
      3
    • I eat local and organic food.
      3
    • I do other stuff (please tell us).
      0
    • I haven't done anything (But you will soon we hope).
      0

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As i voted!!! I don't recycle all my wastes but most of them, cause in greece we can't recycle everything. Also I used to ride my bike since now, I don't move a lot lately!!!

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As i voted!!! I don't recycle all my wastes but most of them, cause in greece we can't recycle everything. Also I used to ride my bike since now, I don't move a lot lately!!!
Ohh thats a shame.

We recycle pretty much everything. We even compost our food.

In my city: Around 95% of people living in houses and about 80% of people in apartments recycle and compost their food. Thanks to this the un-sorted waste has gone down from 5000 tons (year 2003) to 1701 tons (year 2006).

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Just voted!I was happy to see I actually do most of those things...Though I'm sure I can do more! halo.gif There are so many things you can do,I say you never do enough...

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Just voted!I was happy to see I actually do most of those things...Though I'm sure I can do more! There are so many things you can do,I say you never do enough...
Yeah there is a lot more you can do than what I have posted in that list.

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Ohh thats a shame. icon_sad.gif

We recycle pretty much everything. We even compost our food.

In my city: Around 95% of people living in houses and about 80% of people in apartments recycle and compost their food. Thanks to this the un-sorted waste has gone down from 5000 tons (year 2003) to 1701 tons (year 2006).

Really impressive! In greece though the numbers don't count!!! Few people recycle their stuff!!! Even if the country is trying to do something about it...

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This is impressive indeed!!Did your government do something to make you compost your leftovers?

About general recycle,Germany and Austria come first with 66%,while greece is quite below borderline,at 33%...Disappointing isn't it?

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that's what i'm trying to say. Greek people don't give a sh...t about Global warming.

Few recycle their stuff, and that's what numbers say so...Dissapointing at all.

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Well Sweden do have a strong environmental background and it helps when your city is a member of SEkom:

Information About SEkom

History

The eco-municipality concept was first introduced in 1980 by the Finnish authority, Suomussalmi, and was brought into Sweden in 1983 when the Övertorneä local council decided to adopt the concept. As the eco-municipality model spread to various cities and towns throughout Sweden, a network was created as a way of providing support and assistance to cities and towns undertaking ecological community planning. The organization was formalized in 1995 and took on the name “Sveriges Ekokommuner” (SEkom).

Purpose

The guiding principle of SEkom is to encourage development towards a more sustainable society, where the environment gives people the opportunity to have a high quality of life. The main purpose of SEkom is to provide a forum and a meeting place where politicians and municipal employees can exchange information and learn from each others successes and failures. The information exchange occurs through the SEkom website, courses and the annual conference. In addition, municipalities can use SEkom’s 12 indicators to compare themselves to other cities and towns throughout the country.

Currently the network is made up of 68 municipalities, which is about 25 percent of the municipalities in Sweden. The network actively works with decision makers from these localities on important issues that lead to a transition to towards a more sustainable society.

You can find more information about SEkom over at http://www.sekom.nu

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Here recycling is a little hard, because the ecocenter and ecopoints are few.

The differences btw Greece, Portugal and Sweden are natural, because the northern countries pay more attention to the civic problems than the southern countries

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Here recycling is a little hard, because the ecocenter and ecopoints are few.

The differences btw Greece, Portugal and Sweden are natural, because the northern countries pay more attention to the civic problems than the southern countries

Totally true!!!

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I dunno,maybe you are right...I hope we could take some measures to engourage recycle here...

In the Portuguese tv are lots of programs that have a little space dedicated to incentive recycling and energy saving

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But there is no big possibility for such a thing,our politicians are aliens,they don't care about this country/planet so...

Anyway,in every country there must be put pressure on recycling...

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I personally think that you can't have politics as a work. It's something you do for a period and then get back to your normal work. That way you as an politican would understand how "normal" people have it and we might would get more "action" in the politics.

Recycling just makes sense. In Sweden companies have even started to fight about who will get peoples waste so that they can make energy[/url:1743c] from it..

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I personally think that you can't have politics as a work. It's something you do for a period and then get back to your normal work. That way you as an politican would understand how "normal" people have it and we might would get more "action" in the politics.

Agree, but now people can go to college to study political sciences and that makes things worse, because they will only know how to win elections and discuss laws

Recycling just makes sense. In Sweden companies have even started to fight about who will get peoples waste so that they can make energy[/url:4ad39] from it..

Cool

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'Conservation' is still not a part of daily vocabulary in many countries (or in most countries). First and foremost, this needs to become one. Culture needs to change fundamentally.

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'Conservation' is still not a part of daily vocabulary in many countries (or in most countries). First and foremost, this needs to become one. Culture needs to change fundamentally.

Yes, I agree. It’s capitalism or a habitable planet - you can’t have both.

There is no meaningful response to climate change without massive social change. A cap on this and a quota on the other won’t do it. Tinker at the edges as we may, we cannot sustain earth’s life-support systems within the present economic system.

Capitalism is not sustainable by its very nature. It is predicated on infinitely expanding markets, faster consumption and bigger production in a finite planet. And yet this ideological model remains the central organising principle of our lives, and as long as it continues to be so it will automatically undo (with its invisible hand) every single green initiative anybody cares to come up with.

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1) I personally think that you can't have politics as a work. It's something you do for a period and then get back to your normal work. That way you as an politican would understand how "normal" people have it and we might would get more "action" in the politics.

2) Capitalism is not sustainable by its very nature.

Statement one is on target, oh that we could get politicians to agree to LIMITED TERMS.

Statement two is not true because it is not the form of government but the attitude of the people toward recycling. Which, on the most part, I note seems to be the same regardless of country. This is a massive social change issue instead of a government issue. The mind set needs to come from the hearts and minds of the people and not driven down from the top.

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There is no meaningful response to climate change without massive social change. A cap on this and a quota on the other won’t do it. Tinker at the edges as we may, we cannot sustain earth’s life-support systems within the present economic system.

Capitalism is not sustainable by its very nature. It is predicated on infinitely expanding markets, faster consumption and bigger production in a finite planet. And yet this ideological model remains the central organising principle of our lives, and as long as it continues to be so it will automatically undo (with its invisible hand) every single green initiative anybody cares to come up with.

Another thing is that there is the following trend.

... But now, Ms. Jacoby said, something different is happening: anti-intellectualism (the attitude that “too much learning can be a dangerous thingâ€) and anti-rationalism (“the idea that there is no such things as evidence or fact, just opinionâ€) have fused in a particularly insidious way. ...

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/14/books/14...1&ref=books

Rather nauseating. Internet makes it easy for us to cite statistics and mathematical models, so I often cite these scientific data to make my case. However, there are those who simply dismiss these data as 'opinions.' There is a fundamental difference between scientific data and anecdotal opinion. If one wants to not accept a scientific theory, then he/she needs to disprove it scientifically. But, too many people seem to resort to say "It's just an opinion" and decide not to or seem to not be able to have a discussion based on logic.

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