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Energy Alternatives: 3 Different Ways Your Business Can Generate Power

BrookeChaplan

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The cumulative environmental costs of human activities are becoming better understood. In the wake of that understanding, many businesses are looking to limit their own environmental footprint. Some try to do it with improved efficiency. Others are looking to energy production alternatives.

 

Solar

The most mainstream of the energy alternatives is solar. It’s also probably one of the most actively researched alternatives. The steadily increasing efficiency of solar panels is evidence of this. Around 8-12% efficiency used to be the norm, but most solar panels average around 16% efficiency these days.

 

Solar power is limited by the total sunlight you get at your location. Even so, it still serves as a viable supplemental power source in most locales. You can also use it as part of your branding. If you’re trying to achieve a zero-carbon footprint or just reduce your impact, solar panels make a statement.

 

Wind

Less widespread than solar, wind is still a viable energy supplement option for some businesses. The caveat is that you need a fair amount of space for it. An urban business can’t throw up a wind turbine. If you own some acreage for a manufacturing facility, though, it’s worth investigating.

 

Wind energy works on a fairly simple principle. The wind turns the rotor, which spins a shaft. A gearbox converts the slow rotation of the shaft into a fast rotation that drives a generator. The generator produces electricity. This cuts down on your grid-based costs and, again, lets you promote your business as working toward sustainability.

 

Emergency Power Generation

Green energy alternatives are important from an environmental perspective. There are, however, emergency situations that also call for supplemental power generation. Say that a tornado or flooding from a storm knocks out part of the local electrical grid. Solar or wind options might not cover your immediate needs. This is where pragmatism comes into the equation.

 

At the very least, you should have emergency generators or battery backups that can keep the lights on for a few hours. It’s also advisable to get uninterruptible power supplies for your computer equipment. For any kind of lengthy power outage, though, what you really want on site is something like an electricity-producing, industrial boiler.

 

Businesses often get a bad rap for energy waste and pollution, yet many are looking for ways to help preserve the environment. Stricter efficiency policies get businesses part of the way there. Renewable energy sources like solar and wind provide them with options for power generation at a lower environmental cost.


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