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Simon
Simon

Cut back on the meat and help save the climate

Kathy Freston, a "self-help author and personal growth and spirituality counselor", has posted an interesting article over at the Huffington Post about the consequences of eating meat. Or in this case if we didn't:

If everyone went vegetarian just for one day, the U.S. would save:

  • 100 billion gallons of water, enough to supply all the homes in New England for almost 4 months;
  • 1.5 billion pounds of crops otherwise fed to livestock, enough to feed the state of New Mexico for more than a year;
  • 70 million gallons of gas--enough to fuel all the cars of Canada and Mexico combined with plenty to spare;
  • 3 million acres of land, an area more than twice the size of Delaware;
  • 33 tons of antibiotics.

If everyone went vegetarian just for one day, the U.S. would prevent:

  • Greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to 1.2 million tons of CO2, as much as produced by all of France;
  • 3 million tons of soil erosion and $70 million in resulting economic damages;
  • 4.5 million tons of animal excrement;
  • Almost 7 tons of ammonia emissions, a major air pollutant.

The meat industry is a big burden for our climate as it is responsible for about one fifth of all greenhouse gas emissions, in the world. That means they currently pollutes more than the whole transport sector. The cattle release CO2, methane and other greenhouse gases. They also use a lot of land areas, around 25% of the earths total land area. And about one third of all farm areas are used to grow food for the cattle. And by year 2050 the meat production is expected to increase with 50%.

So just like Rajendra Pachauri, who currently chairs the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) since 2002 and who recently won the Nobel Peace Price along with Al Gore, said "that among options for mitigating climate change, changing diets is something one should consider."

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Thanks for your article. These perspectives are of course most important - I would just ask you - are these numbers official? Can they be disputed? In other words could you please provide some good sources? No propeganda, just sources that cant be disputed like you cannot dispute aspects of the climate crises - I will do my share and work to enlight people with this knowledge.

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Wow what startling stats. It is amazing to see the environmental impact of meat...you haven't considered embodied water that goes into meat production as well! It takes almost 5000 litres of water to produce one kg of cheese! I have lots of other stats on the environmental impact of food that I had would love to share with you.

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Those are some big numbers. Please share some more facts if you can. :) Did you also know that it takes 15 000 litres of water to produce one kilo meat from an animal who is being feed with grains. 150 litres of water is needed to produce one kilo of grains.

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Very informative and an interesting to imagine those scenarios presented. I didn't know there's an effect in environment on meat. It would still be hard for Americans to go vegetarian, I think, but if they are serious in doing so, then it might still be possible, just to be environmental friendly.

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Very informative and an interesting to imagine those scenarios presented. I didn't know there's an effect in environment on meat. It would still be hard for Americans to go vegetarian, I think, but if they are serious in doing so, then it might still be possible, just to be environmental friendly.

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