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Simon
Simon

A Picture is Worth...

This picture is an old one, but it's more than worth a re-run. The picture, taken by the Press-Office City of Münster in Germany, demonstrates the amount of space required to transport the same number of passengers by car, bus or bicycle. It clearly shows how small adjustments in our daily life could really mean the biggest difference. Also how sick our car fetish is.

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This is eye-opening. ...But then you remember that generally everybody is coming from and/or going to different places, which is why we can't all take the bus, and that it's impossible to load three kids and the groceries onto a bicycle. What's sick is not the "car fetish" but the fact that our cities are set up in such a way that we have to drive so far to get where we need to go. Developing smaller, closer-knit, better planned communities within cities is a better answer than forcing everyone to wait for the bus or ride a bike several miles in the rain (I live in Oregon).

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I try to convince my father after abandoning my car (even if it's a Smart car), but he won't listen. The trains and buses in Geneva (Switzerland) are so well timed and organized that it's a crime to not use them, especially when the train goes right next door to his office... at least now he uses my car instead of the huge Volvo.

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Life is about balance. Finding the right balance is what it is all about. This is a classic case....If both extremes are either non-feasible or non-benificial, then one needs to strike a balance. PUBLIC TRANSPORT.

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big smelly busses use 10x + the ammount of fuel a car uses just taking the 1st 10 people to their destinations. Starting then stopping is extremely un-economical fuel consumption. If all those people just got in their cars and drove to where they need to be it would use less fuel, be faster and more convienient(the point of transportation anysways), and you don't have to be crowded into a huge deathtrap with a bunch of stinky euro-trash.

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I have heard, from the mayor of a medium size town, that busses are an expensive needed alternative to everyone driving a car. Just think if all the people who ride public transportation drove. You would need to build a lot more parking ramps, and the streets would be a lot more crowded leading to more pollution, gridlock, accidents. Then they would feel a need for larger road projects like maintenance and freeways. I think the answer is in more public transportation, more local shops especially groceries that purchase from area farms, and pedestrian and bicycling friendly towns.

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Stutz, Issam El Jundi, & Cduber made some good points about Buses using a great deal of fuel & are inconvenient and possibly unreliable [late] (my experience in the US of A) At least in the US of A the transportation / infrastructure is built around the car (ie sprawl etcetera) In the US of A a poison air machine (aka the car / automobile) is required (for the most part) in order to obtain a job. [do you have reliable transportation {a car that's trouble free)] The whole transportation idea(s) & ideal(s) should be reexamined. Roads alone may play a large part of the climate change due to the fact that roads absorbed heat during the day and act like a trome wall absorbing heat during the day and slowly releasing it during the night thereby slighly increasing the starting temperature on the next day . Roads also do not absorb water and the run off increases the chances of local flooding. The solution(s) can not be found or installed easily or in a short period of time BUT if we do not start looking and working for real alternatives to the car there may be hell to pay and it won't be a pretty picture if we wait too long to try and change things. Priorities have to be set with the understanding that there will be some suffering during the transition. In the US of A it is more likely we will pay off the national debt than reduce our dependence on the automobile.{it isn't going to happen}

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Living here in the north of Scotland, a car is essential. The busses are few and far between, and cycling would be suicide on the A9. Walking is also out of the question, as everywhere is so far away! But that's the beauty of the wilds of the Highlands!!

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We should stop subsidizing the car by requiring landlords, merchants, and employers that give free parking give an equivalent benefit for transit users. Also, there is no reason for parking meters to be free on the first day of the week (sundays)

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We need to get out of the 'passover syndrome' before it destroys us. No one will fix our problems but us. Starting from within and outwardly into society. I suppose we live in a better world today compared to 10, 20, 100 years ago...but, how much more can we live a better life? Not much more as we are learning day by day. The good news is that there will eventually come a time a shock may awaken us or simply force us to change.

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Norway runs buses on biogased sewage! Sweden bio-gases everything that will bio-gas, and then sells the gas to consumers for cooking, heating, and automotive purposes! The "American Sream" of the mad-cap advertising propaganda machine in the U.S. has finally gone too far, and we all must see the B.S. for what it is, and return to a more realistic lifestyle, with sustainable goals, and learn to put education, especially in engineering, technologies, science and physics first before sports, and "extrecurriculat sexual activities" The huge pool China draws on for its intellectual power will undoubtly overwhelm western knowledge, and replace it with a new afge for mankind! We can hardly afford to be petty in light of the forces upon us, ans will have to yield our comfort zone for a more practical stance fro basic survival, or go with the flow, and learn Mandarin! India also stands tall in upcoming intellectual power, and may even sweep China away with new discoveries and nes science, are we ready to take the back seat yet? Do we have a choice? Can we afford our current extrevagances? I doubt it!

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Norway runs buses on biogased sewage! Sweden bio-gases everything that will bio-gas, and then sells the gas to consumers for cooking, heating, and automotive purposes! The "American Sream" of the mad-cap advertising propaganda machine in the U.S. has finally gone too far, and we all must see the B.S. for what it is, and return to a more realistic lifestyle, with sustainable goals, and learn to put education, especially in engineering, technologies, science and physics first before sports, and "extrecurriculat sexual activities" The huge pool China draws on for its intellectual power will undoubtly overwhelm western knowledge, and replace it with a new afge for mankind! We can hardly afford to be petty in light of the forces upon us, ans will have to yield our comfort zone for a more practical stance fro basic survival, or go with the flow, and learn Mandarin! India also stands tall in upcoming intellectual power, and may even sweep China away with new discoveries and nes science, are we ready to take the back seat yet? Do we have a choice? Can we afford our current extrevagances? I doubt it!

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