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Alex Diaz

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About Alex Diaz

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  1. This is my Sandy statement. It is told in the Up with Chris Hayes video shared below, and I encourage you to see it, share it, and make it yours as well. It speaks of the perplexing and, as Sandy has made clear, life-threatening inability to launch any sensible discussion about climate change in this country, the country we like to call the greatest on Earth. May I suggest we refrain from claiming such a lofty title as long as we remain stuck in this collective schizophrenia that is putting the entire planet at risk. When a crisis this real and deep isn't even mentioned in thre
  2. These past days about 40 African countries have been huddling with the UN to embark on a post-Rio+20 plan for the sustainable development of the continent and its billion people, a plan they hope will be received as a model for the rest of the world to follow. Now, think about that for a minute, or more than a minute. The sustainable development model the world needs to avoid climate and resource catastrophe is not yet in place at a large enough scale anywhere. Western markets grew long ago and did so unsustainably. The emerging markets growing today -- Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin Amer
  3. I've been asked by several folks to comment on the recent Bill McKibben feature column in Rolling Stone magazine that has caused quite a stir. Bill, as we know, single-handedly willed 350.org into becoming one of the most influential climate-change movement and organization in the world today, essentially taking the awareness Al Gore created and turning it into significant and creative action. So anything he writes should be assimilated into our collective thinking. Just as Gore expressed deep disappointment at the slow pace of planet-saving change following his Inconvenient Truth crusade
  4. What are we in this for, anyway? This thing we call life and living. Is it really to earn enough money to buy lots of stuff, thinking that will bring happiness? The car. The house. You know, the stuff. Well, happiness science tells us without doubt that once we get past a certain minimal material threshold (security, food, clothing, shelter, mobility, education, health, etc.), happiness does not come from simply adding more. Rather, it comes from the nonmaterial. Closeness to family and friends. A job and hobbies you love. A community that nurtures... well, community. Feeling vibrant. Enj
  5. Great piece by the NRDC (Natural Resources Defense Council) Switchboard blog on efforts afoot in Latin America to step up on green in anticipation of Rio+20, which will be held here in the region this June. The goals and standards being contemplated, however, fall far too short. They're too green-as-usual. First, the focus is disproportionately on energy, in a region that houses the Amazon and other priceless biodiversity resources, which should therefore place the reversal of deforestation and resource overshoot dead center on the agenda. And second, the region's goals are far
  6. So Keystone has become a high-stakes political chess game following the president's decision to kill the project. This Talking Points Memo article says Republicans have no expectations of getting Obama to sign infrastructure legislation including a Keystone rider, but they'll attach the rider anyway as a pure political play: to blame Obama during the campaign for opposing job creation and economic growth. Frankly, I'm not betting the farm on Obama vetoing the bill, particularly if Republicans in exchange go along with his cherished hike in infrastructure spending, designed precisely
  7. If President Obama's thoroughly embarrassing stumbling-block posture at Durban left any doubt about the softness of his conviction on climate change, the Keystone decision has just nailed the notion. Yes, it's great that the pipeline is dead, and everyone from Bill McKibben and 350.org to every single demonstrator who got this done by leading the charge against the project against all odds, deserves our sincerest and most heartfelt congratulations and gratitude. It really would have been game over for the climate had the pipeline gone through. But as we get past the celebration and r
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