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Found 3 results

  1. On average, American families use about 320 gallons of water daily; moreover, about 30 percent of that amount goes to outdoor purposes during summer months such as filling swimming pools or wading pools, watering the yard, washing the car and taking more showers. As the southwest and other regions approach another year of drought or near drought conditions, it falls on Las Vegas homeowners and business owners to think of ways to conserve water. Water is not an unlimited resource on planet earth; moreover, more water is consumed during the summer months than other times during the year. That said, according to some industry experts, such as Rakeman Plumbing, it's recommended that the following seven ways be used to help conserve water during the hot summer season. 1- Setting Your Appliances Right If you don't already have any in your household, then perhaps it's time to be thinking of gradually getting rid of your old appliances and replacing them with Energy Star efficient clothes washer and dishwasher appliances. Taking it even further, getting a low-flush, energy-efficient toilet alone shaves up to 40 to 50 percent off your water use. 2- Other Appliance Hacks Using aerators or water flow-reducer attachments on your tap, faucets and shower-heads are other practical means to save on water as well. Also, running your clothes and dishwasher on a full load and on the shortest possible cycle goes a long way in conserving water as well. 3- Running Water Never run water continuously when hand-washing dishes, brushing your teeth or even taking a shower. When washing dishes, partially fill a container or the sink with water and then use a spray attachment to rinse off the residue. Brushing your teeth with the water shut off and using short bursts of water to rinse saves up to 60 percent of normal water use. That being said, if you have a house full of small children, then try putting them in all at the same time in the shower or the tub. 4- Using shut-off timers When possible, and not turning on the sprinklers while you're at work, will further add to significant energy savings. Saving water is not rocket science, but it does take discipline. However, by using the above mentioned top seven ways to conserve water, we'll all be off to a more water-sufficient summer. Choose wisely.
  2. During what is now California's worst drought in at least 1,200 years, agencies are ambivalent over how to convince Angelenos to cut water usage. Potential options include everything from educating residents to rationing, fines, and threats. While a recent executive order was issued by Gov. Jerry Brown requiring a 25 percent cut in water use from 2013 levels, communites are left to struggle with how exactly to achieve that goal. Part of the solution may be getting the wealthy to cooperate with working class people. Retired resident Dorothy, 65, has lived in LA's Palms neighborhood for 11 years. She told the People's World, "For people who have a decent salary, life is quite comfortable. But we do have a big problem with the water. Unless we cut consumption by a quarter or even a third, we could end up with a real disaster. And so far, many people are not doing their part to save water, despite what they say. They're just going about business as usual. And bottled water and those types of solutions are sometimes out of reach for the poor." The woman, who emigrated from Germany, said she never ceases to be amazed by how people come along to make a quick buck off of every crisis. She referred to the recent trend of lawn-painting companies - organizations that dye the dried lawns of the upper class a healthy shade of green to keep up appearances. One such company is LawnLift, started by 45 year-old mortgage broker Jim Power, who said, "Most homeowners have no clue how to water their lawns" anyway. According to the LA Times, Escondido resident Sean McDaniel, holding his two pet poodles and gesturing at his emerald lawn, said, "I painted the lawn two days ago." One can buy a 32 oz. bottle of this lawn paint from LawnLift's website for the not-so-low price of $45.95. "It's all well and good that the wealthy are having their lawns painted green," Dorothy remarked, "but that's not a solution." Newsha Ajami, director of Urban Water Policy at Stanford University's Water in the West program, said communities need to employ a wide range of conservation measures, rather than just expecting residents to act on their own. She said that levying fines for wasting water is likely a fast way to change behavior. "You need to quickly get to the point," she said. Jonathan Parfrey, a former LA Department of Water and Power commissioner and executive director of Climate Resolve, added, "We need to soak the rich for soaking their lawns. You gotta price water accordingly so it gets their attention." One extreme, said Beverly Hills resident Daniel Fink, could be curbing lawn-watering entirely for a while. "California is in the fourth year of the worst drought, and has about a year's worth of stored water left," he said. "But one wouldn't know it looking at all the still-green lawns. We have to stop watering our lawns. The water just isn't there anymore. I know that would be unpopular, but is it better to wait until the taps run dry?" This drought, Dorothy lamented, "is one example of how we're all going to suffer from climate change."
  3. Water is the most precious natural resource. It is also one of those natural resources that cannot be created more. The amount of water in this world is fixed. We just need to use it with care to continue meeting our water needs. We need to raise public awareness on water to let people conserve water as much as they can. For this purpose we need to have punch lines about various issues related to water. These 100 slogans on water can be the best messages for water awareness if they are communicated to right audience at right time.