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Found 3 results

  1. How to Live Off the Grid in Texas

    Everyone who lives off the grid has their own reasons for doing so. It might be political, economical, environmental or some other reason. But whatever your motivation for choosing this lifestyle, there are a few basic ideas that you need to get straight in order to make this successful for you and your family. Texas is a great place to live off the grid. Below are four things you must have to live comfortably in this way. Food For many people, living off the grid and homesteading is a very attractive way of life, and living off the land is one of the best parts of that lifestyle. You’re going to want to grow your own fruits and vegetables, and you’ll probably raise your own livestock for meat as well. You can start small with a vegetable garden and a few fruit trees and supplement these with eggs for protein by having a henhouse with a handful of hens and a rooster. This is enough to get you started, but you can upgrade as you go, depending on your land and space available. Water Water will be your greatest concern in some parts of Texas, especially during the sweltering months of summer. An ideal location would have running water coming through your land as a stream or river, but these can be difficult parcels to come across. If you’re looking to buy a modern home that is already built, then search homes for sale in rural areas and check Google maps to look at water features in the region. If you don’t have running water you can try drilling a well to pump your own water. You’ll need the proper permits and licenses, so check your local ordinances to stay in compliance and avoid unnecessary hassles. You can also collect rainwater by setting up a catchment system and water tank to store it during the dryer seasons. Make sure to have UV systems to kill bacteria and filters in place between your tank and your home. You can also install fixtures within the home that have filters attached. Electricity To get your electricity off grid, you’ll need solar panels, a wind turbine or a combination of both. Your particular set up will depend on your area and what kind of wind you’re able to get. Also keep in mind that some regulations might prevent you from having a tall wind turbine, so double check that before you purchase anything. Waste Management For sanitary reasons, you’re going to need to install some kind of waste management system. It doesn’t necessarily have to be very complicated, but again you will need to comply with local ordinances. You can install a cesspool or septic tank in the ground, and this will probably be fine for most families. The decision to live off grid is not one to be taken lightly. There’s a lot of preparation that you’ll need to do in order to live comfortably and to avoid any tangles with local government. By doing your homework and following the rules in your area you can get yourself set up with a wonderful property, a beautiful home and a sustainable lifestyle that you will enjoy for years to come.
  2. Yesterday Obama administration decided to cut 30% of carbon emissions from power plants by 2030 through an ambitious and brilliant plan. Wonderful news for the workers in renewable power plants, less for who works in a carbon plant. But which is the state that has to cut the emissions most of all? At the top there’s Lone Star State. The nation’s top emitter of greenhouse gases, Texas would account for more than a quarter of the total cuts in greenhouse gases that would be required, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. At the top positions we can find Florida, Pennsylvania and Arizona. Rick Perry, republican, governor of Texas, runner for the White House in 2012 (and maybe in 2016), isn’t so happy. The plan “is the most direct assault yet on the energy providers that employ thousands of Americans, and fuel both our homes and our nation’s economic growth,” Perry said in a statement. Apparently he prefer having an air full of CO2. Fortunately other states, like Washington, were more supportive. “We have an obligation to protect our state, our economy and our environment for our children and for future generations,” Washington Governor Jay Inslee (D) said in a statement. Again, Democrats and Republicans are divided on climate change and it’s hard to understand. Does it mean that all the Republicans will oppose this revolutionary plan just to keep alive a dangerous energy system? Next generations hope not. The plan’s benefits are historical: by reducing both the risks of climate change, and the pollution associated with coal-fired power plants, the administration said that the plan would lead to $90 billion in climate and health benefits. It would cost utilities and other companies up to $8.8 billion. Fortunately Texas’s got what it needs to cut the emissions. In fact, Texas is the nation’s top wind-power producer. “Luckily, we have more renewable resources than anyone else,” Armendariz, former EPA top official in Texas, said in an interview. “We just need to do what Texans know how to do: roll up our sleeves and get to work.”
  3. Rick Perry, the religious, right-wing conservative who currently is the Governor of Texas, told a crowd of people in New Hampshire last week that he didn't believe in global warming and claimed that “there are a substantial number of scientists who have manipulated data so that they will have dollars rolling into their projects”. This is what he said: "You may have a point there, because I do believe that the issue of global warming has been politicized. I think there are a substantial number of scientists who have manipulated data so that they will have dollars rolling into their projects. And I think we are seeing almost weekly or even daily scientists are coming forward and questioning the original idea that man-made global warming is what is causing the climate to change. Yes our climate’s changed, they’ve been changing ever since the earth was formed. But I do not buy into a group of scientists who have in some cases found to be manipulating this information." Perry also said that if he wins the election next year and becomes the next US President he wouldn't spend much money to combat the climate crisis and its devastating effects: "And the cost to the country and the world of implementing these anti-carbon programs is in the billions if not trillions of dollars at the end of the day. And I don’t think, from my perspective, that I want America to be engaged in spending that much money still on a scientific theory that has not been proven, and from my perspective, is being put more and more into question." Just crazy! Also check out this related article: The environmental record of Mitt Romney, Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry