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Found 4 results

  1. Check out these beautiful and sustainable lamp designs made from Swedish pine! You can find even more designs here, these are just a few of my favourites: Nock - by Markus Barvestig Nock is a family of luminaires that create good working light in different environments, but at the same time in a natural material that can soften and create contrast in a room. The inspiration for Nock is located in the manufacturing process. What happens if one translates regular production of extruded aluminum to wood? I wanted to produce a profile which, in a simple way, can be cut to varying lengths to get to different products in a family of luminaires. By sandblasting the surface, I want to enhance the pine properties, its beautiful grain and structure. The wood is always softer in the spring wood than the autumn wood, as it has grown faster. By sandblast the pine the spring wood wears down faster than autumn wood and creates a structure with peaks and valleys in the surface of the material. Nock is an honest product, honest to the functions and its materials. The adjustable suspension becomes a visible, decorative detail in the product together with the sandblasted surface that accentuates the pine. Take Away - by Åsa Persson Take Away is a portable light fixture that is based on the idea that people should be free to bring light where they need it. Take Away works well in the home as a desk lamp and in a public place where it can fit as decorative lighting in a corridor. Being able to move a light source without changing an entire interior is a great need, especially since in many homes have dark places that lack space for a lamp. I also wanted to create a luminaire that can be hung on the wall where the empty spaces are available. This will easily be able to move the fixture without making a bigger impact on the surrounding décor. The result is a fixture with associated hooks. A single light source that can be used in various situations where it hung on a hook or placed on a surface. The hooks are placed where light is usually needed, and the fixture can be hung up in the right place. The hook with its solid and sculptural form is to be decorative itself when the fixture is elsewhere. I have chosen to work in Swedish pine wood, aluminum and LED. The materials are raw to give an honest feeling while the contrasts nicely with each other. With the luminaire Take away creates an interplay between man and furnishings. December - by Anna Klara Gleisner The inspiration for the luminaire December is taken from the barren natural landscape in the norden parts of Sweden. Like ice cubes facets sparkles with angular shapes and light bleeds through the screens gaps. As we in the Nordic countries need more light in the winter, the pine shrinks and allows light to pass between the facets. Likewise the pine swells when the heat, humidity and light comes to spring and summer. December is made of Swedish pine and metal with the LED light source. Knall - by Linnéa Werm In the process of producing a light fixture in the pine I turned my gaze to the pristine pine forest and the yellowed varnished pine. From there I created a luminaire that allows expression of the material both sides. Knall is a pendulum, with inspiration taken from the traditional chopping block translated in stylized form. I have chosen to highlight the pine softness, that makes it is easily damaged, and make it its strength. The split and brushed surface reminiscent of its cracks and unevenness of the texture and shape stubs get when for years they stand outside in all weathers. The name Knall comes from the sound of the ax blade meets the log and it splits.
  2. Besides their affordable and stylish furniture, IKEA might soon also start selling electric bikes to eco-friendly commuters in their 303 stores around the world. At least that’s what the Swedish company, most known for their flat-packed pieces of furniture, is hoping for. But for now, the electric bike is only sold in one IKEA store – the first one they opened – located in Älmhult in Sweden. The electric bike is being sold as a test product to see if it’s popular enough to become a viable product in all its other stores. “Here we test new products. And this is a test product. We want to see what the interest is and be sure that we can take care of the product, even after the purchase,” said Daniela Rogosic from Ikea. The electric bike is called Folkvänlig, which is Swedish for people (=folk) friendly (=vänlig), and will come in a “male” and “female” version. If you live near Älmhult in Sweden, the electric bike will cost you 5995 kronor, which is about €600 or $800. IKEA Family members will be able to buy it at a discounted price. The bike weights 25kg and is designed with a front fork in steel and a frame made in aluminium that holds the green-painted rechargeable lithium-ion battery. The battery powers a 250-watt electric motor which gives you a pedal-assisted range of 60 to 70 km per charge. It takes about 5 to 6 hours to fully charge the battery and you can charge it from a standard electric-outlet in your home or at work. The bike is also built with a Shimano transmission with six different driving modes and comes with a two-year warranty (except for normal wear and tear parts such as tires, chains and brake pads, etc.). The bike is heavy but looks much better than similar-priced electric bikes where the battery is often located in the back. And yes, the electric bike will be sold in a flat package and you’ll have to put it together yourself – in a classic IKEA-way.
  3. Kiruna is a small town with less than 20 000 inhabitants located in the most northern parts of Sweden. It's a typical mining community, with iron ore extraction being the key industry of the area. In fact, Kiruna has been an important seat for iron ore extraction and mining industry in Sweden since the early 20th century. So it's not the typical city you would expect to introduce free public transportation for all its inhabitants. But the city of Kiruna did just that in 2011, and the results have been amazing. "The result is incredible," said Niklas Sirén, Vice Chairman of the municipal executive board in Kiruna. "We did not dare set a figure as a goal. There is a very strong car culture, it is sparsely populated here and we figured Kiruna residents are deeply rooted in their driving. We were pleasantly surprised. More people are choosing to leave their cars more often." Niklas Sirén and his local Left Party was behind the suggestion to introduce free public transportation in 2011 on a trial basis. Back then, in 2010, only 120 000 trips were made. But since free public transit was introduced, travel has tripled in Kiruna and the experiment has now become permanent. Last year more than 387 000 trips were made in Kiruna. "This has broken a downward spiral for public transport," Sirén said to ETC. "Previously, there would mostly be only empty buses. Now comes the expectation of more rides and lines. The next step is to expand public transport." But it's not completely free. To be able to use the service, Kiruna residents need to pay 100 SEK, around $14, for a buss card each year. The free public transport does not apply to tourists and other temporary visitors whom instead need to buy tickets to be able to travel. But the card is also available for asylum seekers, and students that lives outside the municipal. For Kiruna, the free public transportation costs around 3.3 million SEK per year.
  4. Today Greenpeace activists protested against recent political plans to introduce new nuclear reactors in Sweden. Dressed as different renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and water, and with the help from a old fire truck the activists managed to cross the security fences surrounding the Swedish nuclear plant. Once inside some of the activists managed to get up on the roof of the reactors, casting new light on the lack of security at the Swedish nuclear power plants. Ludvig Tillman, energy campaigner for Greenpeace Nordic said that: "The Swedish parliament is risking the country's reputation and position as a progressive leader in clean and safe energy development. All the evidence shows that nuclear power is a dangerous, expensive and dead-end distraction from the real solutions to climate protection and energy security. Reactors are standing in the way of energy efficiency and renewable energy programs." "The reality in many countries is that reactors are hugely expensive, construction is often delayed massively due to safety concerns and technical complications, and there is still no solution to deadly nuclear waste," added Jan Beránek, nuclear campaigner at Greenpeace International. It was in 2009 that the current right-wing government announced their plans to scrap the Settlement Act and the ban on new nuclear power in Sweden. The new pro-nuclear agreement will get voted on in the parliament on the 17th of June. Sweden is already far behind other European countries such as Spain, Germany and Denmark in the renewable energy sector. And if the agreement gets a yes from the parliament, sane progress towards a sustainable energy system based on energy efficiency and renewable technologies will likely be blocked and pushed back even further. "The world is watching. Swedish parliamentarians must let reason guide their choice rather than propaganda from the nuclear industry and vote NO to nuclear power on June 17", Tillman said.