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Found 4 results

  1. Nothing completes good design better than impressive, quality flooring. It can reveal a lot about the ideas and inspirations behind the place's general design. This is why, if we aim for an environmentally-friendly space, we have to research the most sustainable options. One such alternative is recycled wood flooring. It is organic, all-natural, and it looks amazingly warm and cosy. And not only that - wood flooring hasn't backed down from the top of the trend wave for years now. However, if you are tired of the sight of wooden floors, you could try recycled carpeting. There is a number of choices on the market these days. The recycled nylon carpets, for example. After some processing, nylon carpets become softer, and also quite pleasing to the eye. In addition, professional carpet cleaners in Melbourne claim recycled synthetic carpeting is easy for upkeep. But here's yet another great design idea. How about you invite the ocean waves inside your living room, or office space, and help saving the ocean environment at the same time. The Net Effect collection by designer David Oakey, integrates used and no longer viable fishing nets in a beautiful and natural-looking design. The fishing nets, which would otherwise turn into waste floating in the oceans and killing massive amounts of water creatures, are used to create carpeting tiles and planks. The gathered nets come from fishing villages on the Pacific Ocean. They are sent to a recycling plant, where mixed with other waste materials, and processed into 100% recycled nylon yarn. The variations of blue colour hues and shapes allow endless combinations to create the perfect ocean view for your indoor space. The patterns even create a slight visual illusion of water movement. It is a lovely way to not only bring the feel of calming nature in your interiors, but also is a statement of sustainable vision and engagement. For more information on the techniques and philosophy behind the Net Effect Collection: http://www.interfaceflor.com.au
  2. Check out these beautiful and sustainable lamp designs made from Swedish pine! You can find even more designs here, these are just a few of my favourites: Nock - by Markus Barvestig Nock is a family of luminaires that create good working light in different environments, but at the same time in a natural material that can soften and create contrast in a room. The inspiration for Nock is located in the manufacturing process. What happens if one translates regular production of extruded aluminum to wood? I wanted to produce a profile which, in a simple way, can be cut to varying lengths to get to different products in a family of luminaires. By sandblasting the surface, I want to enhance the pine properties, its beautiful grain and structure. The wood is always softer in the spring wood than the autumn wood, as it has grown faster. By sandblast the pine the spring wood wears down faster than autumn wood and creates a structure with peaks and valleys in the surface of the material. Nock is an honest product, honest to the functions and its materials. The adjustable suspension becomes a visible, decorative detail in the product together with the sandblasted surface that accentuates the pine. Take Away - by Åsa Persson Take Away is a portable light fixture that is based on the idea that people should be free to bring light where they need it. Take Away works well in the home as a desk lamp and in a public place where it can fit as decorative lighting in a corridor. Being able to move a light source without changing an entire interior is a great need, especially since in many homes have dark places that lack space for a lamp. I also wanted to create a luminaire that can be hung on the wall where the empty spaces are available. This will easily be able to move the fixture without making a bigger impact on the surrounding décor. The result is a fixture with associated hooks. A single light source that can be used in various situations where it hung on a hook or placed on a surface. The hooks are placed where light is usually needed, and the fixture can be hung up in the right place. The hook with its solid and sculptural form is to be decorative itself when the fixture is elsewhere. I have chosen to work in Swedish pine wood, aluminum and LED. The materials are raw to give an honest feeling while the contrasts nicely with each other. With the luminaire Take away creates an interplay between man and furnishings. December - by Anna Klara Gleisner The inspiration for the luminaire December is taken from the barren natural landscape in the norden parts of Sweden. Like ice cubes facets sparkles with angular shapes and light bleeds through the screens gaps. As we in the Nordic countries need more light in the winter, the pine shrinks and allows light to pass between the facets. Likewise the pine swells when the heat, humidity and light comes to spring and summer. December is made of Swedish pine and metal with the LED light source. Knall - by Linnéa Werm In the process of producing a light fixture in the pine I turned my gaze to the pristine pine forest and the yellowed varnished pine. From there I created a luminaire that allows expression of the material both sides. Knall is a pendulum, with inspiration taken from the traditional chopping block translated in stylized form. I have chosen to highlight the pine softness, that makes it is easily damaged, and make it its strength. The split and brushed surface reminiscent of its cracks and unevenness of the texture and shape stubs get when for years they stand outside in all weathers. The name Knall comes from the sound of the ax blade meets the log and it splits.
  3.   Check out this £175 million "Garden Bridge", beautifully designed by Thomas Heatherwick, which will be built over the river of Thames in London. ITV reports that the bridge is controversial but that the project has just been approved by councillors in Westminster.   "This is something that is iconic and absolutely unique, and will be recognised right across the world," said Robert Davis, Deputy Leader of Westminster Council. "I understand the concerns about potential loss of views, but there is no doubting that this bridge will bring substantial and significant benefits to London."   '?do=embed' frameborder='0' data-embedContent>>See the Garden Bridge photo gallery!      
  4. In 2012 I wrote about the plans to build Park Royal - a a green luxury skyscraper in the heart of Singapore.   "With the Park Royal Tower, the architect firm WOHA wants to change how future skyscrapers are built. Instead of the rather cold and hard straight lines that are characteristic of today's more ordinary skyscrapers, the Park Royal Tower will be built with a much softer and greener approach. Some of the building's more natural features include waterfalls, contoured green pathways, leafy terraces and vertical gardens."   The construction of the skyscraper is now finished and the '?do=embed' frameborder='0' data-embedContent>>photo album added below shows the result.