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Found 3 results

  1. The Impacts of Littering

    Nobody likes a litterbug. However, studies show that out of everyone across the country, people from Queensland and New South Wales are responsible for disposing of the most waste improperly. Because of this, the achievements of others around the country who are trying to dispose of their waste properly has been overshadowed. However, if we can teach people just how much their littering impacts the rest of the world, we may see some improvements sooner than we think. It can kill animals We’ve all seen the advertisements and posters about how disposing of our rubbish in the wrong places can kill animals. However, most of us don’t realise that even getting rid of something small like a gum wrapper or a bottle cap can have a big impact later on. And even though it can be hard to clean up on land, it can be even harder to keep the oceans clean, and plastic rubbish is the main form of litter floating in our oceans. It is estimated that about 88% of the ocean’s surface across the world is covered in plastic debris, with about 8 million metric tons of plastic being thrown into the ocean annually. These numbers will continue to grow if we don’t do something about it and the animals that live in the ocean will feel this impact the most because many animals will either ingest this rubbish by accident or get caught in it because it has no idea what it is. This also means that humans that consume marine animals that have plastic inside them will be impacted because the plastic can not be fully digested by any living creature. It pollutes the soil, water and air When you litter, some of the toxins in the products that you are throwing away can actually leach out into the ground and pollute the soil around it. Because soil is absorbent and it can take on a bit of any substance that you add to it, when you add things like plastic or rubbish that contain chemicals to it, the soil will absorb some of the toxins in the litter. Now you may be thinking that there is no way that this can affect you, but you have to remember that most of the things that you eat are grown and raised in soil. So this is another way that littering can directly impact your diet in a negative way. These toxins from plastics and litter that absorbs into the soil can also seep into the water from the ground so that even the water that we drink can be impacted. It costs the economy Littering is not just about the environmental impacts, there are terrible social impacts that littering has as well. For example, it has been noted that areas, where littering is more common, are places where people are most likely to litter, because they may subconsciously follow what other people are doing or have done before. It can also impact other attitudes in the area towards things like crime and graffiti because the atmosphere in these areas is different from those that are cleaner and well looked after. Because littering is such a big problem in city and suburban areas, local, state and federal governments have had to start allocating funds to combat the problem by paying for more people and organisations to clean up litter on the streets. If more people reduced their amount of waste they produce, reused items that can be reused and recycled things that can be made into something new, there would be a lot less rubbish on our streets that has to be disposed of. There are a number of ways that littering can impact our everyday lives. Littering can affect the water you drink, the food that you eat and the streets that you live on and it is something that can be easily fixed if all of us work together to do the right thing. If you are interested in limiting the litter in your area and making a positive change to help the environment, you should join a group in your local area that is focused on conservation and limiting the waste in your area. Littering is not a problem that can be solved quickly and easily, but every little bit counts, so doing what you can when you can, will make a big impact. Author Bio: Susie is a content manager at 1300 Rubbish, a rubbish removal company that can help you to dispose of any residential, commercial, construction or green waste that you want to get rid of in a responsible way. 1300 Rubbish is based in Australia and offers rubbish removal services to people across the country in all of the major towns and cities.
  2. The Funny Way To Recycle Rubbish

    All grown people sooner or later come to the conclusion that life is a game. Depending on your mindset, you can consider this as a positive or a negative assumption. But let's try to see things from the bright side now. When you're playing a game – outdoors or on your computer, you don't take things too seriously. Thus, the importance of your activity is dramatically reduced and the chance to get the job done increases. This principle is the foundation of what experts today call 'gamification' or making a particular job more fun. See how recycling and waste management can be successfully gamified as well. Gamification: Theory & Practice First, let's examine the concept of gamification a little bit more in-depth. The trick is to achieve a game-like experience in a non-game, real-life environment or situation. Of course, this is done using techniques and ideas directly taken from the science of playing: be it electronic games or classic sports played outside. Gamification is proven to be a working yet not aggressive method to make people more engaged with a given activity and make them behave in a desired, predicted way. Turning tasks into game is quite useful in the fields of problem-solving and chores management. Jobs that are generally considered boring are transformed to something more enjoyable or even attractive – cleaning chores, rubbish disposal, filling out surveys and documents/forms and many others. Gamification is also used in teaching with impressive results and that's completely understandable as young people today not always have a high motivation to learn at schools. How Volkswagen's Fun Theory Treats Junk Now it's time to see an interesting experiment - a rubbish recycling gamification. It comes from the world-renowned automotive brand Volkswagen. Their project is called The Fun Theory and has its own dedicated website. There, visitors can see videos that show various practical implementations of real-life games. Also, an award is going to be given to one of the selected ten finalists. Voting has already ended but the entries are still available to view on the site. Back on the actual glass junk experiment. The concept behind this example of gamification is that people rarely recycle the glass bottles collected at their homes. To encourage street passengers to return them, the guys at Volkswagen mixed a regular rubbish container and an arcade machine into one device that they called The Bottle Bank Arcade. For added authenticity, the machine even featured chiptune sounds typical to the vintage game consoles. Weird flashing lights were present, too. So, was the experiment a success? Simply put, yes. The results were more than satisfying and the figures - probably better than what the creators expected. Rubbish removal workers from Sydney suggest that the wide use of such gamifications can be very useful for every highly urbanised city around the world. It's also worth mentioning that not only young people were attracted by the colourful bank. All of this was just the effect of making it fun to return empty old bottles. People earned points for every bottle they threw in, which made them come back and actually recycle more. Do you think that gamification can be also used to solve other 'green' issues? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.
  3. The Largest Landfills in the World

    In a nutshell, a landfill or a dump is the most common method used for waste disposal. In this article, a group of junk removal specialists from Melbourne has decided to put a list of the top 5 largest landfills in the world. You might find number 1 quite surprising... 5. Olusosun Landfill, Lagos, Nigeria - This is the largest dump in Africa and among the largest in the world. The 100-acre landfill receives more than 10 000 tons of waste daily and a significant amount of e-waste dumped in over 500 containers around the site. Because of the chemicals used to extract precious metals in the e-waste, many toxic fumes are being produced. This puts the health of about 1 000 households that have settled in and around the landfill in serious danger. 4. Apex Regional Landfill, Las Vegas, Nevada - With 9 000 tons of trash coming every day the Apex landfill is the largest in the United States. It currently holds over 50 million tons of waste and the numbers are expected to increase to up to a billion tons by the time it closes. This definitely won't be soon, thought, because it is believed that this dump can collect Las Vegas' garbage for the next 200 years. 3. Sudokwon Landfill, South Korea - The landfill was open in 1992 and since then it has collected over 88 million tons of garbage. The daily intake is about 20 000 tons. The dump serves both Seoul and Incheon metropolitan areas. A curious fact about the place is the intention of the South Korean authorities to turn it into a tourist attraction. Moreover, the managers of the site collect the landfill gas and turn it into electricity. 2. Bordo Poniente Landfill, Mexico - By the time of its closure, Mexico City's biggest landfill used to receive 12 000 tones of waste per day and over 78 million tons since its opening in 1985. It was considered one of the largest dump in the world but it was closed at the end of 2011. Since then, the government has taken steps to build biogas plant which will turn methane into energy. 1. Great Pacific Waste Patch, Pacific Ocean - The indisputable winner is not even situated on land. Discovered in 1997, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the final resting place to every plastic bottle and plastic bag that has found its way to the ocean one way or another. The size of the world's largest landfill is still disputable. Some claim is as large as Texas, whilst others go even further by stating it's as big as the whole of the USA. Because the most debris are small plastic particles which float just bellow the surface, it is impossible to detect and picture the pile of garbage from satellite or an aircraft and you can't really see it until you are in the centre of it. It is quite scary to know there are tons of plastic waste floating around the Pacific Ocean and we can't do nothing about it, isn't it?