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Found 7 results

  1. Sustainable Roofing Options for Your Home

    Climate change, deforestation, air pollution. You hear about these things when you turn on the news, pick up the morning paper, and in conversation with friends. The environment and the impact you have on it is an important issue, and you do your best to use sustainable living practices to lighten your carbon footprint. However, when it comes to your roof, you may not know which options will help with that goal. In this blog, we will discuss a few ways to make your roof as eco-friendly as possible. Choose the Right Materials The most important decision you need to make before you can construct your “green” roof is its material. This element will influence any roof’s sustainability, so take time and care before settling on one. Metal Panels The first thing to consider is how long each material will last. For example, metal roofs use more energy than most materials during the manufacturing process, but they last for decades. Their longevity offsets the initial energy use. Once you have these metal shingles, they reflect heat so your air conditioning does not have to work as hard, saving both energy and money. If you live in the city, you may have heard about the “heat island effect.” In cities of one million people (or more), temperatures tend to be higher than surrounding rural areas because developments such as roads and buildings reflect and intensify heat. You can feel this increase on the surface and even into the atmosphere. Unfinished metal roofs contribute to this heat intensity because of their reflective qualities. Avoid contributing to the heat island effect by requesting factory-painted panels in lighter colours. Reclaimed Wood for Shingles and Shakes Wood shingles and shakes have that classic, rustic look that many homeowners adore. Unlike metal roofing materials, conventional wood takes little energy to produce. However, it is still not a sustainable harvest because old-growth cedar tree populations do not always have time to recover before manufactures harvest them again. If you love their look but prioritize sustainability, choose reclaimed lumber. Roofers can recycle wood from previous roofs, bridges, and buildings. Use this for the entire roof or just parts of it. Clay and Concrete Tile Shingles As one of the top environmental choices for homeowners, tile roofs last for decades. However, the clay or concrete may weight too much for some houses, so ask a professional roofer to evaluate your home before you choose this material. When he or she visits your home, ask about lighter-weight options that contain recycled content. Living Plants The “greenest” roofing option may literally be green. Living roofs are gardens that cover parts or entire roofs. They support mosses, shrubs, herbs, bushes, and grass that sit in soil on top of a waterproof membrane to protect your home’s interior. This roofing option lowers cooling costs, reduces carbon usage, and lessens rainwater runoff. However, it comes with an initially high price tag, and you have to maintain it more often than other roofing materials. You must treat this like your lawn since its plants have a similar growth rate. Only choose this option is you have a flat or slightly angled roof and can maintain the plants. Install a Cool Roof In the “Metal Panels” section, we mentioned that you should ask request shingles in lighter colours, but we didn’t explain why. Well, think about it in the context of clothing. If it’s hot and sunny outside while you wear a black shirt, you will likely feel the heat more intensely than your friend who wears a white shirt. This is because lighter colours reflect heat while dark colours absorb it. When you place dark materials on your roof, the colour absorbs heat and transfers it into your home. On the other hand, a cool roof creates a barrier that deters direct sunrays and ambient heat. You can use nearly any roofing material you prefer and still create a cool roof by: Coating roof with reflective paint Installing a sheet covering Replacing the current roof with reflective tiles or shingles Insulate Your Attic You must insulate your cool roof to reap its benefits. Proper insulation protects your home from extreme outdoor temperatures and helps air conditioning or heating systems work at maximum efficiency. Insulation materials should vary depending on the type of house and the climate. Consult with a roofing contractor to see which you should select, including: Open or closed cell Cellulose Wood fibre Gypsum board Perlite Cellular glass Prioritize your attic insulation, particularly where it meets your roof, to create the most energy-efficient home possible. Seek Professional Installers Proper installation is a critical step in any eco-friendly roof. Therefore, choose a professional roofing company team that has experience in sustainable roof construction. Don’t forget to ask questions about which material you should choose, how to make your roof cooler, and what insulation would work best for your home and climate.
  2. You may be surprised to hear that private homes account for over 40 percent of all energy consumed within the United States. If you are ready to cut back on your family's energy consumption and start saving on monthly bills, then take a look at these five affordable upgrades with an excellent return on investment. Tankless Water Heaters An older water heater can be one of the biggest energy consumers in a home because they keep an entire tank of water hot at all times. Tankless water heaters (on-demand water heaters) only heat water as it is needed, and this means lower gas or electricity bills and a home that never runs out of hot water. Light Tubes Everyone should upgrade to compact fluorescent lights at some point, but another simple way to save on lighting is to have light tubes installed. These simple tubes can fit around important structural components of a home and provide light to any room. Window Treatments Anyone with windows that are more than a decade old should consider upgrading their treatments to improve the insulation of their home. Studies show that older residential window treatments cost the American public $35 billion a year. Newer treatments will provide a home with additional layers of insulation to keep UV rays out during the summer and warm air in during the winter. Foam Roofing Older roofs are another major problem when it comes to energy efficiency. Foam roofing, available from places like Armstrong Installation Service, is nearly 500 percent more efficient than traditional roofs and provides much better protection from moisture. This relatively new technology works on a variety of roof types including flat and sloped roofs. This foam can also be sprayed around solar panels and other structural components. Trees Planting a few perennial trees will not only improve the appearance of your property, but it could also cut down on your HVAC bills during the summer. Placing these trees near windows will allow them to act as a windbreak as well as shade those areas from the sun. Having an energy efficient home no longer means that you and your family must do without modern amenities. Often all it takes is a few simple upgrades to make serious improvements with your home's carbon footprint. This includes utilizing new technology such as tankless water heaters, wall insulation, and new window treatments.
  3. The type of roof you choose plays a major role in the amount of energy your company uses for heating and cooling. Given that climate control is responsible for the lion’s share of your energy usage, it makes sense to take steps to lower those expenses as much as possible. Today’s business owners are looking to green roofing solutions to lower their costs and to conserve natural resources for future generations. Cool Roof Roofing materials that absorb heat create several problems. Overheated attics that result from these types of materials shorten the lifespan of the roof and radiate heat into the building, stressing the HVAC system, driving up energy usage and shortening the serviceable life of the HVAC unit. Modern roofing materials are engineered to reflect the sun’s energy and to quickly re-emit absorbed heat. Thanks to modern materials engineering, cool roofs can be covered in asphalt, metal or tile, and they can come in a wide array of colors. Cool roofs are instrumental in lowering energy bills and increasing the overall energy efficiency of the buildings they cover. Long Life Roof Traditional asphalt roofs are designed to last an average of 20 years, but a long life roof can last 50 years or more. These roofing systems are green in the sense that they divert waste from the landfill because a traditional roof will have to be replaced an average of three times for every long life roof installation. These long-lived roofs are typically metal or slate, but modern engineering and innovation have created 50-year roofs from rubber, recycled tires, and even asphalt. What makes these shingles last so long is their ability to reflect the sun’s energy which also makes them energy efficient. Living Roof Covered in vegetation, some roofs are literally green. This type of roof goes by many names: vegetative roof, green roof, and living roof. A living roof can be flat or pitched. It can be covered in grass or artfully landscaped. The popularity of green roofing in cities is increasing as people recognize the combined benefits of natural outdoor spaces and the energy saving properties of a roof that doubles as a park. In addition to increasing your office’s energy efficiency, they have been proven to benefit the environment and your employees’ morale in immediate and direct ways. All green roofs can increase your office’s energy efficiency, but a vegetative roof can also provide a pleasant escape from the city’s heat and barrenness. Whatever route you choose to go green, you will be benefitting both your bottom line and the environment.
  4. There are a lot of factors to consider when selecting a roofing contractor for a roof installation. It goes without saying that you want a roofer with plenty of experience. It’s also important that you select a roofer with a good reputation in your community and a proven track record of doing high quality work. Of course, the quoted price also has to be taken into consideration. One factor that many homeowners overlook when choosing a contractor is the roofer’s warranty. Don’t rely solely on the manufacturer’s warranty When you have a new roof installed, the roofing materials come with a warranty from the manufacturer. This protects you in the event the roofing materials fail prematurely. But sometimes, a problem with the installation itself can cause the roof to fail sooner than it should. Many manufacturer’s warranties will stipulate that a problem in the first two years isn’t covered. When the problem is with the installation, the manufacturer’s warranty won’t be any help. In this situation, you hope that the roofer will stand by their work and fix the problem. Check the fine print Any reputable roofer will offer some kind of warranty on their work, but not all warranties are equal. When selecting a roofer, it isn’t enough to just ask if the roofer offers a warranty, you need to pay attention to the details and read the fine print when comparing roofing warranties. There’s a big difference between a warranty that promises to “fix all defects” and a warranty that says it will “keep the roof watertight.” Pay attention to the language used and be wary of warranties that use exclusive language to limit what the roofer will fix. Also see how long the roofer’s warranty is. Some will offer free repairs for the first couple of years and a discounted rate thereafter. Other considerations Even the most generous warranties can be voided if you don’t properly care for the roof. If you never have your roof inspected, or if you don’t clean out the rain gutters and allow debris to accumulate in the roof valleys, you can’t expect the roofer to honor a warranty since a lack of roof maintenance could be to blame for roofing problems. To be safe, only work with a roofing contractor who has a brick and mortar location in the area. If you have a fly­by­night roofer or storm chaser install your roof, there’s a good chance they won’t be available to make repairs down the road. A local roofer with a good reputation in your community, however, will be there to honor a warranty should it be needed. Home improvement news brought to you by bartonroof.com Source: everybodyneedsaroof.com/News/Details/2040
  5. With utility bills on the rise, we are all looking for the most feasible ways to maximize the energy efficiency of our homes. Multiple studies performed by some of the most authoritative experts in the US, show that the roof is the easiest and often the most cost-effective way to cut down on electricity bills. Here are the top ways for greener roof and home: Choose Reflective Roofing Materials (The Cool Roof) The materials traditionally used for roofing tend to absorb the solar energy rather than deflect it, which often leads to higher energy expenses. When the roof temperature is high, more heat gets into your house and your air-conditioning appliances consume a lot more energy to reduce it. However, over the past few years a new type of materials emerged, which have solar reflective properties and help reduce the temperature of the roof with up to 30 percent. Furthermore, the modern cool roofing solutions are also very effective at releasing the accumulated solar heat and this is commonly known as high emittance property. Probably the simplest and most effective way to cool down your roof is with special coating, which is applied on top of the existing structure. In cases when you build new residence or remodel an existing roof, you should consider using lighter colored versions of asphalt and shingles. A great source of information about how to make virtually any type of roof cool is made available by the US Department of Evergy. Insulate the Roof & Attic To insulate your roof and attic in order to maximize energy efficiency around the house is really a no-brainer. However, when it comes to choosing the most suitable insulation for your specific needs, things get a bit more complicated – there are so many types out there that even experienced professionals can get confused. My personal advice is to use the R-value of the insulation to determine its heat transfer resistant properties – the higher these are the better ability the insulation will have to keep the heat inside your home, so that you don’t spend a fortune on utility bills. Sustainability Whether you are remodeling the existing roof of your house or you are building a new one, choosing the most sustainable materials will almost immediately result in energy savings. Most of the time with up to 30 percent! Choosing sustainable roofing materials requires seeking professional advice, from experienced roofer, like Apex Roofing in Texas. I don’t say you can’t get the job done yourself, but it will be much difficult as there are so many factors to consider, such as climate in the area, the type of the house and off course your budget. Once all these considerations are in place, you are ready to proceed with your roofing project and pick up the materials you will use. With these top ways to maximize the energy efficiency of your roof, you can quickly cut down on electricity bills by as much as 50 percent! If you do basic calculations for your utility savings, you will quickly realize how cost-effective roofing actually is.
  6. Martha Morales has had a difficult couple of years. Last year she nearly lost her home to foreclosure but she was just barely able to save her home by working long hours to keep a roof over her four children’s heads. Then this year, she noticed that her roof was leaking. She got a number of estimates all for around $10,000. Then she found a roofer who claimed he could do the work for half. Thinking she was getting a great deal, she paid him the $5,000 up front and the roofing work began. Unfortunately, just one week into the project, the roofer and his sole employee vanished with her money never to be seen again. A little investigative work on Martha’s part revealed that the roofer was never licensed to begin with and that he had pulled similar roofing scams in other communities. Now she still has a leaking roof and is out $5,000 and doesn’t know how she will afford the repairs. Unfortunately, this story is all too common. Though the majority of roofers are legitimate, licensed business people, there is no shortage of fly-by-night roofers who either intentionally scam people, or simply lack the motivation to finish the work they start. To prevent this from happening to you, here are four tips to protect yourself when having roofing work done. Look out for suspiciously low bids A reputable roof knows what their services are worth. Even if you get several estimates, the range in bids shouldn’t be too great. If there is an outlier on the low end of the spectrum, for instance a roofer that offers to do the same work for half the price other roofers are asking, that is a bad sign. Likely, the roofer knows their work will be of lower quality or the roofer has no intention of finishing the work to begin with. Check with the BBB or local chamber of commerce Many communities keep tabs on construction workers and roofers to prevent scams. You can check with your local chamber of commerce or Better Business Bureau (BBB) to see if a given roofer is registered with them. The BBB keeps a record of complaints brought against companies and whether or not they were resolved. Ask for credentials In most communities, roofers are required to have a roofing license which proves they have the proper training. Don’t be afraid to ask to see a roofer’s credentials. Any reputable roofer will have a license, the proper building permits for roofing work, and insurance to protect their employees and your property. Never pay upfront Finally, never pay upfront. The majority of roofers don’t take payment until after the work is completed. Though not every roofer who asks for payment upfront is out to scam you, the risk is certainly higher. Play it safe and hold onto your money until the work has been completed. Home improvement news brought to you by bartonroof.com Source: news10.net/story/news/investigations/2015/04/24/unlicensed-roofer-on-run-and-cslb-offers-tips-to-protect-self/26337975/
  7. When it comes to dirty jobs, there aren't many as challenging and dangerous as roofing. There are a lot of hazards when it comes to repairing and installing roofs. Despite the dangers however, many roofers continue to do the work day in and day out because it's what they love. Here's a look at some of the hazards roofers face every day. Heights The obvious first danger any roofer faces is the risk of falling. When your primary work environment is one to two stories off the ground, that's always a concern. If you have a fear of heights, roofing is not the job for you. And if it isn't already bad enough, most residential roofs have at least some slope to it. The combination of sloped roofs, and working two stories in the air can be a deadly combination. Every year hundreds of roofers end up falling. Roofers learn pretty quick to be constantly aware of their surroundings and to know where they are in relation to the edge of the roof at all times. Weather Another hazard roofers face every day is the weather. It isn't always 70 degrees with a calm breeze. In summer months temperatures can easily reach triple digits. With the hot sun beating down on them and reflecting off the asphalt shingles, roofers may feel as though they are working in an oven. Heat stroke, heat exhaustion, and dehydration is a major concern for roofers in the summer. To deal with extreme heat roofers will work early in the morning and later in the evening when the temperatures are lowest. Summer isn't the only season when roofers have to worry. Cold winter weather can lead to slippery conditions while working on a roof. Combine that with strong winds and you have a recipe for disaster. Burns What many not familiar with the roofing industry don't know is that roofers are frequently working with hot materials such as tar. Contact with hot sticky tar can lead to very serious burns for roofers who must be constantly vigilant especially when working with these materials. Insects Finally there's the insects like wasps and bees. Roofers who've been in the industry long enough will eventually encounter a beehive or wasp's nest. Up on a roof with no where to hide, roofers sometimes have to make a split second decision to endure the stings and bites or take the plunge to the ground below. Call the professionals While a do-it-yourself attitude is admirable, roofing work is very technical and involves many hazards. It's always best to leave roofing work to the professionals who have the proper training and equipment needed to do the job safely and effectively. Home improvement news brought to you by bartonroof.com Source: nanaimodailynews.com/opinion/dirty-jobs-roofing-can-be-dangerous-and-uncomfortable-1.866281 B)