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Found 5 results

  1. The roof protects your home interiors from snow, wind, hail, storm, rain and sun. It also ensures that heat from either the outside or inside does not leak to either side. If the roof is energy-inefficient, it may be costing hundreds of dollars in heating and cooling costs. Here are factors of your roof that may impact on the energy efficiency of your home. The Level of Insulation Ideally, energy efficiency is ensuring that the temperature out there does not affect the indoor temperature. One of the areas where outdoor temperature may influence your indoor temperature is the roof. The insulation levels in your attic determine whether the house losses some of the cool air during summer or gets cold during summer. Inspect the attic insulation regularly. Install additional insulation when necessary. Quality insulation also protects the roof from damage due to condensation in the attic. Ventilation Your roof requires some ventilation to offload the excess heat that may be hidden in the attic. During the cold weather, the trapped heat in the attic may thaw the snow prematurely and create ice dams. Ice dams eventually become points of weakness and leakage on the roof. You may end up with expensive leak repairs or roof replacement. During the hot weather, trapped heat may make your cooling systems less efficient. Therefore, it costs you more to cool the house that you should. Moreover, poor ventilation may tap moisture under your roof and cause damage to the holding beans and the roof structure. Trapped moisture can lead to mildew growth and rust on your metallic fixtures. Color The color of the roof also affects the energy efficiency of your home. Dark-colored roofs usually absorb lots of heat during summer. They can heat up to over 150 F° in a hot summer. The extra heat is transmitted to the attic and other materials in your home. This increases the indoor temperature thereby raising the energy consumption of your air conditioning systems. You end up paying more to keep your house cool. Consider light-colored roofs or roofs made from light-reflecting materials. You can also seek the help of professional roof contractors such as Stevens Roofing Corporation to help determine best colors to reflect heat. This enhances your energy efficiency and keeps your home cooler. Cut your energy costs by improving the energy efficiency of your home starting with the roof. Install the right roofing when building or refurbishing the house. Check the above elements to lower your energy costs.
  2. There is no question that the world is ready for solar energy. In the United States, the Office of Energy Efficiency estimates that the growth of major solar energy installations has grown by more than 1,700 percent since 2008. While most installations have been of the utility, industrial and commercial kinds, residential systems are expected to grow exponentially through the end of this decade. In 2017, electrical vehicle manufacturer Tesla announced its intention to start taking deposits on residential installations of an advanced solar roof panel system complete with transformers and batteries; this announcement has sparked considerable interest from homeowners who are now looking up at their roofs and wondering what they would need to do in order to get some panels installed. In essence, there are three important things for you to consider before weighing the possibility of going fully solar: Roof Inspection When was the last time you had your roof inspected by a professional company like Burke’s Roofing ? Unfortunately, many homeowners wait until they spot a leak or an ugly brown stain on their ceiling panels before they resolve to call technicians for roof repair services; this is about the only time an inspection is conducted, and on many occasions, the findings are not pleasant. A roof inspection is a must before installing heavy solar energy panels on top of your house; in fact, you may want to do this now before the next winter or rainy season so that you can budget for repairs accordingly. Ventilation Your current roof system has a particular ventilation arrangement that may not be fully compatible with the intended roof panel installation. The vents may need to be relocated and tested so that they preserve the level of energy efficiency your household requires. Roof Leaks In rainy climate regions such as South Florida, some homeowners will notice a roof leak during a heavy tropical storm or when a hurricane makes landfall. In many cases, the leak seems to be manageable because it is limited to a drip and does not seem to spread across the ceiling; in other words, these leaks are nothing that a pan or bucket will not solve, and they tend to not be an issue until the next hurricane or spectacular rainstorm arrives. The problem with this nonchalant approach is that it could be ignoring serious issues such as missing shingles or damaged flashing, which would certainly need to be repaired before solar panel installations. In the end, the state of your roof will determine whether you can really take advantage of solar energy production. Do not attempt to forego roof inspections and repairs before solar panels are installed.
  3. While great strides have been made to further geothermal, wind, and other forms of clean energy, these methods lack the ease and simplicity of harnessing solar energy. This is clearly demonstrated by the growing popularity of solar panel roofing with homeowners. Tax Credits and Assistance Federal and state authorities offer a tax incentives to homeowners who adopt solar panels. The federal government offers an investment tax credit of up to 30 percent, which helps defer the cost of having panels installed. Some states offer additional credits and incentives. For example, in 2016, Washington D.C. established new laws which not only reward early adopters, but also set aside funds to assist lower income families with the cost of installation. Quick Return on Investment Solar panels have never been cheaper to install, and you can begin earning back the cost of installation almost immediately thanks to net metering and solar renewable energy credits (SRECs). You can sell your earned SRECs right to the utility provider, as they pay homeowners who produce clean energy. This essentially translates into extra income, which is further supported by net metering, a separate system of credits that subtract cost directly from your power bill. Increased Property Value Studies have firmly established that owning solar panel roofing is a net gain for homeowners. The Federal Housing Administration has established new guidelines which require solar energy systems to be included when appraising the value of a property, so having solar panel system can significantly raise your home's appraisal value. Solar paneling is a sound property investment that can dramatically raise the resale value of your home. While not all properties are suitable candidates for installation, a roofing company like Acoma Roofing, Inc. can quickly determine if your home has the necessary structural design to support paneling. Reduced Energy Bills Homes with solar panel roofing have shown energy bill reductions as much as 30 percent, and even higher for homes that integrate larger systems. The average lifespan of a solar energy system is 25 to 30 years, so when factored over that period of time, this amounts to massive savings on electricity. The last decade saw a 5 percent increase in electricity costs, while solar systems went down about 70 percent over the same ten year period. The upward trend in electricity cost will continue, but investing in a solar system now will insulate you from the inflating prices. Clean and Renewable All financial considerations aside, solar paneling is a simple and accessible way to lower your carbon footprint and improve the environment. Furthermore, since the panels can be installed on your roof, no clearing land for installation is necessary, further supporting their value to the environment. Unlike traditional fuels, solar panels release zero harmful emissions. Beyond basic maintenance, solar panels are long lasting, making them a long-term, renewable energy solution. The Future Between rebates, credit programs, and other financial incentives, solar panel roofing is a safe and affordable way to both add value to your home and lower your energy costs. More importantly, they are a simple way to invest in the health of the environment, thereby making our collective future a little brighter.
  4. Amidst skyscrapers and bustling cities, gardening seems almost a thing of the past. Not anymore. A new trend is hitting cities throughout North America, and it just might be what your business needs. Rooftop gardens are interesting, environmentally-friendly, and even a little edgy. Even if you don’t own a restaurant, your business could benefit from your own rooftop garden. Rooftop Garden Benefits When you think of a successful business, a rooftop garden probably isn’t the first quality that comes to mind. So why are businesses choosing to incorporate them? There are several reasons. Uses unused space In an urban setting, there’s little room to enjoy a garden—and purchasing land for gardening is expensive. Yet your roof is just sitting in the sky, teeming with possibilities. Why not put that space to use? Reduces pollution Rooftop gardens aren’t just great for your business; they’re great for residential roofs. The National Research Council of Canada estimates that a large number of rooftop gardens in an area could decrease smog and heat stress and lower energy consumption. Not only will this help the city where you live or work, but it could also increase your business. Many customers love companies that strive to be environmentally conscious. Lowers utility bills Plants provide a natural form of roof insulation, meaning they help lower your heating and cooling costs. Provides entertainment and relaxation The best part about a rooftop garden? Human interest. Customers will flock to your garden—and your business—as a place to relax and enjoy themselves. In a busy, polluted city, a rooftop garden offers a sigh of relief. How to Start a Rooftop Garden If you’re thinking seriously about a rooftop garden, first consider your business’s roof. It needs to be flat so the plants can sit comfortably, and customers can safely walk on it. It also needs to be sturdy enough to support the weight of the plants. You’ll want to check with a roofing contractor to determine whether your roof can support a garden. There are three different types of rooftop gardens: Extensive Green Roof: supports mosses, herbs, grass and other plants requiring inexpensive, shallow soil. Semi-intensive Green Roof: supports shrubs, bushes, and herbaceous plants, with a deeper soil layer. Intensive Green Roof: supports a wide variety of plants and trees with a deep soil layer. If you know your roof is safe for any of these types, you’ll next need to know where to put your plants. Containers are the most obvious choice, but some rooftop gardens grow their plants in rows of soil, just as typical gardens do. If you use containers, keep in mind that clay, cement, and terra cotta pots are all very heavy and will add to the weight on your roof. On the other hand, plastic and synthetic containers can’t support tall plants and may get knocked over in the wind. Your choice depends on which plants you keep, and how windy conditions are on top of your roof. Once you have sturdy containers, it’s time to choose your plants. You’ll need plants that can withstand heat, since rooftops are closer to the sun. You’ll also want plants that don’t require much soil. Herbs and vegetables are always great choices. Now, get your hands on high quality soil and fertilizer. You’ll need to fertilize your plants about every 2 to 3 weeks and water them regularly. Depending on the types of plants, you may need to prune them and eliminate pests. Rooftop Garden Wonders Are rooftop gardens successful? Just ask the dozens of businesses that are trying it. Many people are finding that rooftop gardens are a great addition. Make sure you’ve evaluated all the costs before you plow forward. To see if your business’s roof can handle a rooftop garden, speak with the roofing contractors at Century Roofing Limited.
  5. Make Your Roof More Eco-Friendly

    The roofing on a house is arguably one of the most important features. The quality of the materials chosen will either protect against weather and insect damage, or leave a home vulnerable to costly repairs. Roofing can also be used to make a house more eco-friendly. Properly chosen and installed, roofing can cut down on the environmental impact of a home, from the production stage of materials to the amount of energy a house uses daily. There are hundreds of products to choose from, and narrowing them down can take some time. Here are a few options to consider in several different price ranges. http://homedesignlover.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/7-green-roof.jpg 1. Metal Roofing Metal roofing one of the most affordable, eco-friendly options for roofing. It is durable, low maintenance, and relatively inexpensive to have installed. One product that is popular in the Australian market is Colorbond roofing. It comes in many different colors and choosing a light color will help keep the roof cool. Colorbond is produced to withstand the weather and insect life specific to Australia. As with any roofing the color will begin to fade over time. However, rather than having to replace the entire roof (as you might with asphalt shingles) you can simply have a professional repaint the steel roofing. Roof painting should be done by a professional as they are best equipped to provide an even, well-blended finish. Here you can read about the stages of roof painting: http://www.myroofline.com.au/roof-painting.html 2. Recycled Materials The pricing on recycled roofing materials can vary widely. One option is to use synthetic tiles made from recycled postindustrial waste. This helps prevent waste from ending up in a landfill, and many of these synthetic tiles are also recyclable. That means that when it comes time to replace the roof, the materials can be recycled rather than thrown in the rubbish. Recycled synthetic roofing tiles tend to be a fairly affordable option for most homeowners as well. Another option for recycled roofing is terracotta tiles. These tiles are beautiful, and can be made from old pavers, bricks, or roofing tiles. They do tend to be more costly and they add quite a lot of weight to a roof. Before installation, it is important to make sure the underlying supports can withstand the extra weight. Chipped or cracked tiles will need to be replaced periodically, and old tiles can be recycled. 3. Green Roofs Green roofs are a trend that is catching on in Australia. They consist of installing a lip around an existing, generally flat, roof. From there, a waterproof membrane is installed along with a root barrier. Finally, plants are used to cover the roof, providing excellent insulation. They also create much needed greenspace in urban areas. The cost of installing a green roof is fairly high, and there is a bit of upkeep to them as well. It is also very important to check that your local area can support the water needed to maintain a green roof as many areas in Australia have a limited supply of freshwater. That said, they are an attractive and extremely eco-friendly option for roofing. For more information on green roofs follow the link below: http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/green-science/green-rooftop.htm