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Found 4 results

  1. Many businesses are generating waste, and don’t even realize that there is a better way of handling it. Becoming more environmentally conscious is the first step to making your business more green. Here are some ways that you can work to resolve your unnecessary business waste. Excess Energy Consumption Energy consumption is a hot topic when it comes to making your business more eco-friendly. You’ve probably heard all about changing out your light bulbs for more energy efficient models. Another step that you can take is to make your business more self-reliant when it comes to your electricity usage. Install solar panels on the roof so that you can generate some extra power. Switch your servers to a cloud based system. Older servers use a lot of power to run. By taking them offline, you could dramatically cut your energy consumption. Recycle Old Electronics Recycling is a big part of becoming more eco-friendly. You probably already have a recycling program in place to deal with paper waste and other items. Consider expanding your recycling program to include your old electronic equipment. There are programs that want your old electronics. Many of these organizations are charities that give them to those that are less fortunate. You can also sell your old electronics, and donate the money to a charity of your choice. Create a Reclaimed Water Program Waste water can be a problem in many manufacturing environments. Purchasing a wastewater filtration system can help to alleviate some of your concerns. This water can then be used where it’s safe to use other reclaimed water. An example of this would include the water needed to flush your toilets. This water would in no way be drinkable, but it can go to other uses. The waste portion could be disposed of in the proper manner, while saving you some money. Convenience Items Over Reusable Many businesses don’t even think twice about purchasing disposable items. This trash is then deposited into the landfill. Creating more garbage isn’t very environmentally friendly. Replace these disposable items with reusable ones. Purchase reusable water bottles for all of your employees. Stock your break room with real plates and utensils. This will cut down on the amount of items that you need to purchase. It will also prevent more trash from entering the landfill. Focusing on reducing business waste is not only good for your bottom line. It’s also good for the environment and the image that your business projects.
  2. Most of us never think about where our water comes from and often take for granted that when we turn on a faucet, water comes out. We take a showers and never think about how much water we use. Watering plants and lawns on a summer day is typical of many suburban homeowners. How quickly are we using up our water supply? Read on and you might be surprised at what you learn. Our Major Supply Typically, our supply for water comes from rivers, lakes, and streams. Over time, however, that water supply begins to become diminished and must be replaced. This is where groundwater comes in. This is water beneath the Earth's surface. Groundwater supplies drinking water for more than half of the US population, and almost 100 percent for rural populations. It helps crops grow, is used in various industries, and recharges our freshwater. In other words, groundwater is critical for survival. Water Scarcity Water scarcity is the lack of available water resources to meet the usage. Over time, our population has grown tremendously, and continues to grow every day. In fact, the population is growing and using water much faster than it can be replaced. Water scarcity affects the entire world. Over a billion people at this time lack access to clean drinking water. Other factors water scarcity can affect includes climate changes, pollution, and waste. Waste is often seen in industry. Used for crops and factories, water is often wasted before it can be used. T. Luckey Sons, Inc. who do dam repair in Ohio are often called to projects where leaks and excavations wasted more water than they saved. The Effects Water scarcity is affecting all of us and many of us don't even realize it. Man-made products can often get into groundwater and pollute it. Examples might be pesticides, road salt, and oil. Drinking this water can cause diseases and our wildlife is harmed continuously through this. If we have lower water levels, wells will no longer be able to reach some groundwater and more energy must be used to pump the water. This causes costs to rise significantly. Lakes and rivers are diminishing rapidly, and the supply to replace is simply not coming in fast enough. Water is constantly wasted by industries and homeowners. For example, many sprinkler systems are set on an automatic timer. Our children and grandchildren are facing limited water supply in the future. Wildlife are dying out due to contamination and low supply. Where will our new water source come from? We need to pay attention and help take care of the environment. This is our future home for our families. Disease, famine, and drought should not be their future.
  3. Oil spills are major environmental disasters. They can endanger wildlife, destroy ecosystems and cause serious economic damage to communities affected by them. The future of plants, animals and human beings would certainly be better if all future oil spills could be prevented. End Humanity’s Dependence on Fossil Fuels Perhaps the simplest way to end oil spills is to gradually reduce the need for oil drilling. Some headway has been made in this direction—hybrid cars that are partially powered by electricity are now available from all major auto manufacturers. Ethanol, which is created from corn, is also gaining popularity as an alternative fuel source. Overall, there are many benefits to ending dependence on oil beyond preventing oil spills. Independence from non-renewable energy sources should certainly be a goal that human civilization aims to achieve in the foreseeable future. Hold Oil Companies Accountable In a free market system, there need to be incentives for businesses to act. Without financial incentive, negligence and pollution become commonplace. This is why holding oil companies financially accountable is absolutely necessary for spill prevention. If oil spills can irreparably harm their profits, companies in the industry will be sure to guarantee they do not happen. Financial punishments can either come from government fines or though the civil court system—either way, the financial punishments must be massive to match the massive profits of these oil companies. Monitor Oil Drilling Near At-Risk Ecosystems Another way to fight oil spills is to thoroughly monitor companies drilling for oil near ecosystems that are most at risk for being harmed by a spill. This, of course, requires action from the government. While it is unlikely that all unsafe oil drilling could be stopped this way, petitioning the government to have drilling activities monitored in areas where they could do the most harm is an excellent idea. Keeping Equipment in Good Shape One of the best ways to prevent accidents and disasters, in any industry, is to ensure all equipment is well-maintained and kept in optimal condition. This is also true for any storage containers used, especially the barrels and drums of the oil industry. A specialist from Powerblanket says barrel storage can be difficult for any material that isn’t extremely shelf-stable, meaning oil companies should take great care to prevent any possible damage as a result of inadequate storage. 4. Be More Vigilant Overall, oil spills happen due to negligence—they are not created on purpose (with a few historical exceptions). If those responsible for safe drilling would have been more vigilant in their efforts to prevent oil spills, most major spills on record may have been prevented. This should even be the case for regular citizens. While a minor spill originating from the tank of a fishing boat will not have as big of an effect as an industrial-sized spill, it can still pollute the environment. Oil spills can ruin an ecosystem for plants and animals for generations. We owe it to the environment to try to ensure that another major oil spill does not happen.
  4. As the State of Pennsylvania continues to battle with various oil drilling companies regarding environmental violations, fracking sits at the top of list. Comparing the elemental damages to the amount of these proposed fines may mirror a lopsided playing field of sorts. Proponents of the fracking phenomena apparently see nothing wrong with polluting the groundwater contained in nearby streams via mishandled wastewater, thus killing off seemingly countless schools of fish, and rendering otherwise healthy water supplies undrinkable. Many of those who oppose these fracking methods may have stronger legal legs to stand on, as the practice itself has gained some notorious national attention. The fracking (aka fracturing) process is designed to extract fossil-based energy sources that lie deep beneath the earth’s surface. Drilling is one thing, yet injecting toxic chemicals into the core in order to hit pay-dirt is another. The increased risk of chemical leakage is now clear and present, as literally thousands of drinking water contamination complaints have been filed against subsidiary drilling companies that actually have legal permits to use the Marcellus Shale drilling site; one case in particular involves felony criminal charges that are still pending. Exxon Mobil Corporation District Judge James G. Carn ruled that each of the eight charges recently filed against the oil giant were all valid enough to warrant criminal proceedings. Two of these charges included violating the state’s Clean Streams Law and the Solid Waste Management Act. Exxon Mobil is chiefly being accused of wastewater tank tampering; the removal of a plug from one of their refuse receptacles resulted in 57,000 gallons of the liquid seeping into the soil and subsequently causing harm to local residents and the surrounding strata. Contesting these charges, Exxon Mobil representatives asserted that the spill had “…no lasting environmental impact.” Range Resources The Pennsylvania Dept. of Environmental Protection (DEP) fined the Texas-based gas and oil company $4.15 million for employing the same illegal practices used by Exxon Mobil, all of which took place between 2009 and 2014. Range Resources repeatedly violated a number of the state’s environmental protection laws, yet the mishandling of wastewater topped the list of many fracking infractions committed at the very same Marcellus Shale drilling site. Even though the imposed fine is the largest in Pennsylvania DEP history, the profits made from these extractions heavily outweigh the penalty amount, which may simply be the price of doing business for big oil. These two incidents are merely a drop in the bucket when it comes to the fracking boom and its latent functions. Exxon Mobil is the first company to face criminal charges, which may turn out to be a benchmark case to be used as precedent for future criminal fracking violations. Hopefully future companies can learn from their example, and the example of good green practicing companies like Great Canadian which does green roofing in Edmonton. The future will be brighter when businesses can raise the standard of their practices and incorporate more beneficial green works.