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  1. Did you know that the amount of waste generated from construction and demolition is more than double that of household garbage collection? However, you can significantly reduce your next project's carbon footprint by using recyclable materials. Many eco-friendly materials also offer other advantages like exceptional strength and durability. If you're planning to build or remodel, consider these four recyclable materials that can make both your home and the environment stronger. Bamboo Flooring You're probably already familiar with bamboo in things like cooking utensils and bath accessories, but did you know that it's also great for hardwood floors? Bamboo flooring is durable, easy to clean and maintain and can be refinished when it gets worn or damaged. Bamboo is also a highly sustainable crop, and bamboo floor tiles can be recycled into composite bamboo, which is often used for high-traffic areas and outdoor applications like decking. Cork Flooring If bamboo flooring doesn't strike your fancy, how about cork? Soft and comfortable to walk on, cork is an excellent choice for bedrooms and playrooms. Cork is allergy-friendly and easy to clean, which makes it a great alternative to carpet. Plus, it's one of the most eco-friendly flooring materials on the market because it's not only recyclable but also biodegradable and made from renewable resources. Metal Roofing Because of their high value, metals are among the most commonly recycled materials in use today. If you're looking for an eco-friendly roofing option, look no further than metal. A metal roof is easily recyclable, energy efficient and exceptionally durable with a lifespan of up to 70 years. Whether you're building a new home or just remodeling, consider calling your local metal roof installers for a roof that's approved by Mother Nature. Glass Tiles Used in a wide variety of consumer products, glass is another material that's commonly recycled. Despite its fragile reputation, glass can be strong and durable in many applications, including floor and wall tiles. Choosing glass tile for your kitchen backsplash or walk-in shower is a great way to lower your home's carbon footprint and raise its aesthetic appeal. Glass tile is also highly customizable because it can be easily cut into different shapes and sizes. Remember, using recyclable materials is only half the picture when planning an eco-friendly construction project. It's also important to seek out recycled and reclaimed materials whenever possible, and don't forget to choose a waste management company that recycles leftover waste and debris instead of dumping it in a landfill.