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Found 4 results

  1. It's happened to the best of us. You're unwinding after a long day at work on the couch, cozied up with a glass of wine and feeling utterly relaxed when suddenly a gross spider or centipede scurries across your coffee table. Gone is that feeling of relaxation, replaced with formication and unease. While some earthy types might be okay sharing their home with pests, the majority of us want them out. If you're in a situation where pests are disturbing your sense of ease and contentment in your home, then ask yourself these three questions before taking action. Is It Something I'm Doing? Most pests will take up residence in your home regardless of your housekeeping skills. However, there are some situations where to be put it bluntly, it might be your fault. For example, unswept hardwood floors and dusty ceilings can create a paradise for some types of spiders. Messy kitchens where food particles are allowed to accumulate can create a paradise for ants and roaches. The best first step is a day of hardcore cleaning in your home. While not guaranteed to get rid of your pests, it might help. Is It Fleeting? There are some periods throughout the year where we see an increase of spiders and centipedes, such as late spring and early fall. This coincides with their mating habits. Some infestations are in fact fleeting and will go away on their own. However, if you've been repeatedly seeing pests for longer than two months, you might need to take action. Can I Eradicate Them On My Own In A Safe Way? The short answer to this is "no." There are lots of commercial insecticides available at home supply and hardware stores, but most professionals dislike them for two reasons. First, they're generally not as effective as the chemicals used by the pros, sometimes rendering them a complete waste of time. Second, the average person doesn't take precautions for safety, such as wearing a mask and removing pets from the area. Eradicating insects is generally a job that is best left to the professionals like those at Allstate Pest Control, especially if you want those pests gone for good. After you've considered these things, you'll be able to make a decision about how you want to deal with your pest problem. No one wants to share their home with creepy unwanted guests, but thankfully, there are steps you can take to solve the problem.
  2. While no one wants to damage the environment or risk the negative health effects of dangerous pesticides, it's also true that no one wants a house full of pests! These nasty critters bring their own issues, spreading disease and creating unsanitary conditions. Now, innovative pest-control solutions are in the works that can help keep your living spaces pest-free without the damage of dangerous chemicals. 1. Heat Treatments Bedbugs are notoriously difficult to kill, since they can burrow deep into mattresses and upholstery, which aren't affected by traditional cleaning treatments. The Entotherm Heat Pod is a portable solution for treating infestations of bedbugs as well as other pests like lice and fleas. The pod uses dry heat to kill these pests in all their life stages so that a single treatment is all that's needed to eliminate the infestation. 2. Diatomaceous Earth Though this safe, organic pesticide isn't necessarily new, it's just starting to gain popularity. Diatomaceous earth is essentially the fossilized silica shells of microscopic sea creatures. It's perfectly safe for humans and pets to handle—there's even food-grade diatomaceous earth that's used to keep insects out of grain destined for food production. For insects, though, the tiny, microscopic shells are like fragments of broken glass, cutting through their exoskeletons and causing them to dehydrate and die. Diatomaceous earth works both indoors and out, but it must be dry to be effective, so reapply in the garden after rain or heavy dew. 3. Eco-Friendly Freezing While winter is a highly effective outdoor pest control in many places, it's not always a solution for indoor pests. Freezers can kill insects, but few people have access to walk-in freezers large enough to do the job, and the technology typically employed in these kinds of refrigeration units isn't always particularly green. Instead, companies are developing green technology using liquid carbon dioxide, which freezes insects on contact, is completely non-toxic, and leaves no residue. It's even safe to use on fragile antiques and electronic equipment since the liquid turns into a dry, solid "snow" when it hits the air, and evaporates as a gas before melting. 4. Biological Pest Controls This is a tricky technique to manage, and is most commonly used in gardening and agriculture. In the past, farmers have tried introducing insects that prey on the problematic pests, but it's always risky to add new species in an area where they weren't previously found. Instead, scientists are now turning to much smaller pest-control allies, like nematodes, which are already found in soil around the world. Now you can purchase nematode inoculation kits, which increase the number of pest-controlling nematodes in your garden or fields. These microscopic organisms attack and cut down the population of everything from ants and caterpillars to grubs and fleas. Though pest control is crucial to keeping your home and family safe, it's not always necessary to reach for a bottle of poison to take care of the problem. With new advances in pest control, you'll be able to keep the bugs at bay without damaging the environment in the process! Contact a pest control company like American Pest Control Inc for more information
  3. Most people are aware of the impact commercial farms have on the impact with their use of pesticides. What many do not realize, however, is regular home and garden use of pesticides adds up to 160 million pounds of chemical use every year, which is more than the government and businesses combined. Want to do something to help the environment while keeping pests away from your home? Green pest control methods can be just as effective as chemicals or even work better without the use of chemicals that can harm the environment, pets, and children. Eco-friendly pest control methods can be effective against all types of pests, including rodents, cockroaches, termites, and more. What Makes Pest Control "Green?" Eco-friendly pest control strives to use the least toxic method first to control a pest problem. In general, green pest control solutions are less damaging to the environment and less toxic to living creatures not targeted by the treatment, such as pets, humans, insects, and aquatic life. This approach to pest control often begins with making your home and garden as inhospitable to unwanted creatures as possible by removing food and water sources and using natural compounds that deter pests. From there, chemicals with reduced toxicity can be used to combat an existing problem. Here's a look at several highly effective green pest control solutions that can help protect your home. Bora-Care for Termites Bora-Care is a boric acid system that works as a stomach poison against termites. Bora-Care can be used to protect wood from becoming a food source for termites and its low-toxicity, unlike the chemical sulfuryl fluoride that's used in fumigation. A pest control professional can help you decide if Bora-Care is a good solution for your home. Eco-Friendly Cockroach Control You can stop and track down cockroaches in your home without chemical bait. Simply use store-bought sticky traps or make your own by adding banana peel to a Mason jar and lining the rim with petroleum jelly. Place the jars near pipes and sinks then wait for the roaches to get trapped. Once you track down where they're collecting, inject boric acid into crevices and cracks. Boric acid is a low-toxicity chemical that causes dehydration and death in roaches by affecting their exoskeleton. It's far safer than the alternative, organophosphates, which are the most common types of pesticides to poison people. When working with a pest control professional like All Seasons Pest Control, ask if they use eco-friendly solutions. You can also request non-chemical solutions whenever possible to help control or prevent an infestation.
  4. Termites can do thousands of dollars worth of damage to your home. If you see them, it's tempting to want to call an exterminator to deal with the infestation quickly. Exterminators use chemicals to kill termites, which isn't great for the environment. Instead of using chemicals, there are organic, eco-friendly ways to deal with termites. Sodium Borate This compound is mildly toxic but not detrimental to the environment. Sodium borate kills the termites ability to process food so they will die. It can be dusted around the perimeter of the home to deter termites from entering. It's recommended that the compound is added in the attic, basement and window sills to keep termites from entering the home. Keep pets and children away from the dust. It shouldn't be ingested by animals or people. The dust can be applied carefully so it's not in an exposed state. Carefully apply the sodium borate along the cracks in between the sills and the wall. In the basement, it can be added in cracks in the wall or along the outside of the home. Beneficial Nematodes Nematodes resemble unsegmented worms. There are a few different species of nematodes and most are considered pests that will attack plants and ruin crops. The nematodes that are considered parasites are tiny and will attack tomatoes, lettuce, corn and carrots at the roots. They will cause lesions and distorted leaves in plants like onions and alfalfa. The damage they cause can be extremely widespread and kill off entire farms. The beneficial nematodes will eat organic matter so they're used in compost. The family of nematodes that eat insects include Heterorhabditidae or Steinernematidae. They can be purchased from home improvement or garden centers. Nematodes thrive in moist, humid environments. It's important to keep the soil damp after applying them. Before using either option, decide which would benefit your problem and give a solid solution. Sodium borate leaves a light dusting of powder that can produce a mess if not applied correctly. With nematodes, you're introducing a parasitic entity into your yard. Make sure you have the correct type of nematode because the wrong kind can kill plants.