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Found 2 results

  1. Not recycling will eventually cease to be an option. The environment can’t continue to support a society that focuses on single use items and disposing of them in the landfill. Here are some of the reasons that you should recycle as much as possible. Pollution Reduction Rubbish that’s sitting in a landfill emits greenhouse gases and other harmful chemicals that are impacting the rate of climate change. This means that the more rubbish there is, the more damage is being done to the Earth. You can help by focusing on recycling much of your household rubbish. For example, purchasing reusable packaging and reusable items eliminates the amount of rubbish that has the potential of finding its way into a landfill. Less rubbish equals less harmful chemicals entering the atmosphere. Land Preservation The amount of space that a landfill requires means that there’s less space for you and other wildlife. Living near a landfill is also an unpleasant experience because of the smells and noise pollution that inevitably go with them. More animal habitats can also be preserved when you decide to recycle your items instead of tossing them out. All of this additional land could be preserved and potentially have more trees on it that would contribute to helping to reverse climate change. Resource Conservation Resources are a very valuable commodity. Throwing these resources into a landfill isn’t a good use of them. Recycling items like scrap steel reduces the amount of damage that’s done to the planet. This is due to the fact that new metal sources don’t need to be mined and refined to make the products that you require. The mining and refinement process is also contributing to the increased rate of climate change and is impacting the world around you. Ocean Impact Plastics are a big problem in the oceans. Marine life is being harmed because of these floating plastic islands that may be intentionally discarded there. If this trend continues, you’ll see a major impact in the food chain. Other animals consume marine life and this will mean that your food could become tainted with these plastic particles. Scientists don’t know the extent of what this will mean for you, but increasing your recycling efforts can help to stop this destructive cycle. Recycling is imperative to the continued health of the planet. Consider the ways that you can help in the fight against climate change by investing in a recycling regiment.
  2. It’s almost that time of year again- cue the mince pies, tinsel, personalised gifts, chirpy carolling, and most importantly, the endless string of decorated Christmas trees. But at what a cost? In an age where we have the appropriate knowledge and technology to investigate the real impact of nationwide gorging and extravagance, shouldn’t we care about what the festive season does to our environment? Hundreds of thousands of Christmas trees are cut down each year, each to fulfil their destinies of being draped in tinsel, adorned with the angel or star of your choice, and housing the piles of gifts kids each year. Many opt for an artificial festive symbol instead, all with the misconception that Christmas trees are leading to deforestation and further negative environmental impacts. In actual fact, Gary Chastegner, professor of plant pathology at Washington State University has stated that "most Christmas trees are grown as crop and replanted, so it is really no different than harvesting corn". Chastagner goes on to explain that a natural reseeding takes place in forests, and permits are distributed in areas where the trees need to be thinned. The National Christmas Tree Association have stressed that using real pine and fir trees is actually a more green thing to do than purchasing an artificial Christmas tree for your living room. According to research, most fake Christmas trees are only used for 6-9 years and then disposed of. Keeping the plastic tree for longer than this period would eventually be thrown away into a landfill. These trees, unlike real trees, are not recyclable or biodegradable. In addition to this, in 2010, The New York Times reported that fake trees usually contain a harmful chemical called polyvinyl chloride or PVC. Essentially, just manufacturing these trees can be harmful to the environment. Recent years have introduced the most ethical choice of all. You can now ‘rent’ your Christmas tree for the festive period. This means that you can choose the Christmas tree of your choice, which comes with its own sustainable root system. This tree is delivered to your door (which saves you time and money on travelling to purchase the tree yourself), and then picked up at a date which suits you, early in the New Year. The tree is then returned to the soil, and grown on for the new year. If you really are trying to limit your carbon footprint this Christmas, don’t let your efforts stop at your choice of tree. Make sure you opt for LED fairy lights for example. These new style lights help save energy and money. What is more, their relatively cool heat will make your tree less of a fire hazard too. This may sound like stating the obvious, but don’t forget to recycle after you’re done with celebrating for the year. Figures suggest that a mere 10% of Christmas trees are recycled for wood chipping and compost each year in the UK. In our capital alone, almost 1 million trees are just thrown away each January.