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Found 5 results

  1. Recycling is more than just good for the environment. In fact, there are many economic and social benefits as well. Here are a few such benefits that you can see as a result of recycling: It Helps to Create Jobs Recycling materials has led to an increase in job creation. More people are needed to sort through the recycled materials. The sorted materials can then be sold back to manufacturers. This in and of itself pays the wages of the workers that are employed at these recycling facilities. There is more than one job created per one thousand tons of recycled materials. The more that you recycle leads to more jobs being created. The more people that are employed generates more tax revenue for governments. This leads to more social services being available. It Reduces the Price of Goods It costs less to purchase recycled materials than it does to create new materials. This is because of the savings potential in obtaining, extracting, and refining new raw materials. Manufacturers can save up to ninety percent on their raw material budget just be using recycled goods. This savings can then be passed along to the consumer. Having more money in your pockets helps to keep the economy thriving. You have more expendable income and can purchase other items. This cycle is what keeps the economy running. Results in Lower Garbage Bills Recycled materials have an intrinsic value. Metals, plastics, and papers are valuable due to the cost of producing these items as new materials. Your garbage disposal company can sort these materials out and sell them back to the manufacturers. This has led to the reduction in your garbage bill. The waste disposal company is getting back some of the costs associated with operating their company. It can cost a lot to dispose of materials in a landfill. Lowering your monthly bills allows you to have more money in your budget to spend on other things. Creates Less Landfill Waste In many areas, space is limited. Landfills may be taking up prime real estate locations. Keeping materials out of the landfill reduces the amount of space that is needed for these landfills. Another benefit is that many of these recyclable materials aren’t biodegradable. Plastics in particular will likely be in the landfill forever. Removing these materials puts them to better use. They can be repurposed into other items. This reduces the amount of pollution that enters the environment due to the creation of new plastic materials. Recycling provides the economy with many important benefits! The more people that participate in recycling, the stronger the economy grows.
  2. Are you passionate about environmentally responsible practices and green living? Would you like to have a job that paid your bills while also helping to save the planet? Today’s colleges are focusing more and more on providing degrees that can work for the environment. Whether it’s a science research in declining species, to a technology degree to help with wind turbines, or even an online mba in management information systems, more degrees are being created with the world in mind. Below are four job options you might be interested in, and how to get involved in the environment with your degree and career. Solar Panel Installer The solar energy industry has been booming in recent years, and as the technology has improved and the supply and demand have increased, costs have dropped significantly. This has allowed homeowners and small businesses to have solar panels installed on their homes and buildings, and reduce their electric bills to mere pennies per month. Solar installation is becoming a very popular job, and installers can make pretty good money. In some cases, specialized training via tech schools is not even necessary, as some employers will offer paid on-the-job training for new installers. Wind Turbine Distributor Not only have solar panels become more popular over the past few years, now wind turbines are rising in popularity too. And we're not just talking about those massive, high tech windmill that dot the landscape out in the desert. We're talking about much smaller units purchased by homeowners to set up in their back yards. There are many companies out there now who are looking for distributors, so you don't necessarily have to work for the company who designs and installs the systems; instead, you can become an outside sales representative and work for commissions. Green Energy Auditor Energy auditors inspect homes and commercial properties, looking for ways to cut down on energy costs. They often focus on improving window and door insulation to reduce heating and cooling costs. They might also recommend lighting systems that could reduce electricity usage. These types of changes not only help their clients to save the planet and preserve precious natural resources; they also help them to save money by reducing their monthly electric, gas and water bills. Green Home Designers Green design elements are being incorporated more and more into home construction and design, allowing for some pretty interesting and fulfilling jobs as green architects and green interior designers. Green principles can be applied every step of the way, from using recycled building materials, double-paneled insulation in the walls, double-paned glass windows, low-watt CFC lighting systems, rain catch-water systems, skylights and more. What better way to show off your artistic creativity, do something good for your community and for the planet, and make a living at the same time? These are just a handful of options in the green job market, but these ideas barely scratch the surface. There are countless opportunities out there today, with more being created every year. This is a young industry with a lot of room for growth. Go for the gold and find a program or job that offers a little more satisfaction for your part in the environment.
  3. Climate change has badly hit most of the countries of Asia. Most encouraging thing is that people of this region realize how global warming and environmental hazards are impacting their way of living. This was disclosed in a survey conducted by Climate Asia of BBC. It also revealed that people have to change their lifestyle and alter their sources of living because of rising level of threats due to climate change. People of Pakistan are worst affected by the menace of global warming while people of Bangladesh have more awareness on harms of environmental degradation on them. People of Pakistan and China have the idea of how their living conditions declined to the worst level during previous ten years due to climate impact. The survey was conducted in seven selected countries of developing regions of Asia including Pakistan, China, India, Malaysia, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka etc.
  4. Cutting greenhouse gas emissions will throw millions of people out of work! That claim has made many working people reluctant to support action to slow climate change. But is it true? Our Jobs, Our Planet, a report written in 2011 by Jonathan Neale for the European Transport Workers Federation, argues the opposite, that changing the ways that goods and people are moved can reduce emissions from the transport sector by 80% while creating over 12 million new jobs – 7 million in transportation and 5 million in renewable energy. The author of Stop Global Warming, Change the World writes that such a program will be a big win for workers and for the planet: “there are more than 40 million people out of work in Europe now. The planet needs help. They need work. If we succeed, we can solve both problems at once.” Neale’s argument focuses on four kinds of changes: Reduce. We change our lives so we use less energy. For example, cities with dense populations, nearby jobs and local shops create less emissions than suburbs and hypermarkets. Shift. We use a different kind of transport. For example, getting passengers out of cars and into buses cuts carbon dioxide emissions in half. Improve. We make transport more efficient. For example, better designed trucks moving at slower speeds will cut carbon dioxide emissions in half. Electrify. We stop making electricity by burning coal and gas. Instead we use renewables like wind and solar power. This can cut carbon dioxide emissions to almost nothing. The majority of Neale’s 103-page study is a well-documented explanation of how those four principles can be implemented in Europe today, dramatically reducing fossil fuel use while creating millions of new permanent jobs. He also addresses a problem that many such analyses ignore —that under capitalism, jobs created in one area often means jobs eliminated elsewhere. Much more employment in public transport can mean much less in auto manufacturing, for example. That’s why, Neale argues, the transition requires an integrated plan based on public ownership of the industries involved, with a “bedrock guarantee … that anyone who loses a high carbon job is guaranteed proper, lengthy retraining and a new job at the same wages or better.” He urges the labour movement to adopt a two-pronged program for reducing emissions and expanding employment. “If unions stick to policies that support growth in all sectors, we will not be able to deliver that growth. Climate change is coming. If we do not take radical action, we will face radical circumstances. When climate catastrophe arrives, governments will cut aviation, trucking and much else swiftly and savagely. Then there will be no protection for the workers affected. “So unions will need to do two things at once. We need to campaign for serious cuts to emissions. But we need to insist at the same time that those cuts can only come if workers are properly protected. We need to be control of the process, not have it done to us. This is not just a matter for workers in aviation and road freight. It will only happen if workers in other sectors, and other unions, insist that all workers are protected.” Our Jobs, Our Planet: Transport Workers and Climate Change is an important report in its own right, showing what could be done in Europe today with proper planning. It’s also an important example for labour and environmental activists everywhere: this is the kind of analysis and program we need to build an effective labor-green alliance to save the world. I’ve posted the full report here. (pdf)
  5. Energy companies in Calgary, Alberta, are attempting to make their first network of natural-gas export terminals as lucrative a business as their counterparts in Texas. The first step, however, is finding almost 50,000 workers willing to make the move to Alberta. Over the next decade, the Petroleum Human Resources Council of Canada estimate that as many as 47,900 oil and gas jobs will need filling over the next decade, and if British Columbia’s efforts are included, more than 100,000 jobs could be created. In order to tempt workers to make the trip, housing complexes with significant amenities are in the process of being constructed. Workers will find their homes boast indoor golf driving ranges, two-story gymnasiums and even private movie theaters. Calgary-based company, Atco, has even added squash courts, a running tack, and recreation rooms with Ping-Pong and foosball tables.The atmosphere and entertainment options are a not-so-hidden attempt to mitigate the isolation workers from across the globe may feel if they do decide to join one of the many future projects. It’s difficult to tell if any perk will overshadow the isolated West Coast, but perhaps the wage inflation might. Remoteness may become more bearable when considering that labor shortages in Canada have already resulted in many oil and gas workers’ wages skyrocketing as much as 60 percent higher than the same job pays in the United States, according to both U.S. and Canadian labor data. Workers in Texas, often envied for their high wages, make approximately $29.50 an hour. Those same positions in Canada can earn up to C$44.80 ($42.01) an hour, according to the numbers from Nabors Industries. The main instigator for Canada’s sudden wave of gas export construction is the country’s desire to meet rising demand in Asia. Last year, Japan alone imported $58 billion of liquefied natural gas last year. Chevron, which is among the Alberta Natural Gas companies looking to profit from this venture, is aiming to build a pipeline across Canada’s western mountains as well as a plant on the country’s freezing Pacific Coast to allow shipping to Asia. That project alone will require as many as 5,500 workers. Other companies looking to benefit from Asia’s need are Royal Dutch Shell, and Petroliam Nasional. The project leaders, which include Chevron, intend to secure financial partners and long-term contacts with suppliers before proceeding with the proposed ten export LNG terminals already looking to receive building permits. If even five of the projects are built by 2021, then at a minimum, 21,600 workers will be needed, and an estimated C$47.8 billion will be spent. The housing alone will cost Canadian energy companies an average of $200 a day per person, since competition to acquire workers has resulted in work camps that function more similarly to a hotel than the previous dorm style living standard. Now, labor costs can make up to as much of half the construction budget of a typical LNG plant, and Canadians can expect the living price to continue to rise. In Australia, similar competition resulted in resort-style living. In addition, due to the demand for skilled workers, such as those who could weld cryogenic equipment, some workers earn as much as $500,000 a year. B.C. Premier Christy Clark is hoping for British Columbia to make a similar, if not bigger contribution to the natural gas energy market as Alberta. Clark says that as much as 150 years worth of natural gas reserves can be found in B.C. fields, as much as Alberta has in their oilsands. Clark believes that B.C. and Alberta will be doing the “biggest favor for the environment” by helping China and the rest of Asia reduce dependence on coal. As she says: “[Canada] would be doing a huge favor to the world in reducing greenhouse gas emissions because we all share that air.”