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Found 2 results

  1. An environmentally friendly car is society’s attempt to reduce air pollution and decrease everyone’s dependence on gasoline. However, buying a brand-new hybrid or electric car is not an option for everyone. Sometimes, it works to compromise by looking at the features that make a car green and the features that don’t make it green. Here are 4 tips to consider as you look for green used vehicles. Compare the Gas Mileage Gas mileage, also known as fuel efficiency, determines how far the car goes without needing to be refueled. This rate is the most important factor to consider when looking at an energy-efficient vehicle. You should not automatically choose the vehicle with the highest mpg ratio, though. You also need to consider other design features, such as the car’s engine, tires, weight and type of oil, that affect its energy efficiency. Compare the Toxic Emissions Rate A great deal of a city’s air, soil and water pollution comes from cars. In major cities, much of the toxic air pollution is caused by vehicle emissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sets Tier 2 and Tier 3 standards to limit the amount of emissions that are released by certain types of vehicle. People who want used vehicles should review the general toxic emissions ratings that are available. Compare Hybrid vs Non-Hybrid Vehicles When people hear of energy-efficient cars, they often hear of hybrids that run on petroleum and electricity. It’s not necessary to buy a hybrid to drive an environmentally friendly car. It is necessary to learn the similarities and differences between hybrid vehicles and non-hybrid electric or gas-powered vehicles. Compare the Repair Rates When buying a green used vehicle, avoid the one that requires a lot of repairs. It may be cheaper, but it consumes more energy than a healthy vehicle. A damaged car emits more toxic gases into the air as it struggles to work properly and becomes overheated. Make sure that your chosen car is built well with a long lifespan, and have it maintained at least once year. Green used car buying is not always straightforward. Sometimes, it takes learning the basics of hybrid and electric vehicles that you’ve heard of but know nothing about. But your efforts of trying to save energy and the environment will pay off in the end. Continue to review the tips and tricks of finding the best deal for your used vehicle.
  2. As a nation the Australians have invented a great deal, from the refrigerator to the surf ski. But who would have thought that Australia would also be the home of a car that runs on tap water? Well, such was the vision of an amateur engineer who invented a new type of fuel cell that allows almost any car to run on nothing more than water. The revolutionary inventor, known as Joe, envisaged a world where fuel for our cars flowed as freely as water from our taps. The invention came about in the 1990s when fuel prices were on a never ending incline . Inventor Joe, frustrated at having to pay high prices for petrol started the process of developing a cheaper alternative. After scouting for some simple parts in a local scrap yard, the Australian experimented on his own car, a V8 Rover, until he eventually invented what was to become known as the ‘Joe Cell’ – an electrolysis cell built from stainless steel pipes that runs on nothing more than H2O. During a documentary series Joe revealed he created the configuration by ‘throwing it together in a weird order’ and that he was surprised when he ‘hit the key and the damn thing ran’. According to Joe, the water in the cell needs to be charged but is not consumed and can be affected by a number of factors. Over the past several years, many scientists have invented different versions of water-powered cells. However, unlike the Joe Cell, most of these cells were charged by hydrogen a compound element of water. The Joe Cell, on the other hand, doesn’t involve extracting hydrogen from water, but rather using simple household water. Many theories claiming to explain how the Joe Cell works have emerged over the years. Among these is the Orgone energy theory, which attributes the Joe Cell to be an Orgone Accumulator – a device that runs on an omnipresent energy source. While other reports claim the Joe Cell generates a gaseous substance that produces energy when ignited. The lack of scientific verification has meant the Joe Cell has remained highly controversial amongst the scientific community. Some respected scientists have openly condemned the theory as pseudo-science. While some environmentalist groups have herald the Joe Cell as a reputable invention, which could dramatically change the way we consume energy. The Bryon New Energy Charitable Trust have published claims that they have successfully driven a car across Australia on less than two cups of water. The Trust’s founder, Sol Milin, reported to the Bryon Echo Newspaper that the ‘want to find useful power sources for the planet that enables people to power vehicles for free’. However, the Bryon New Energy Charitable Trust has yet to develop a useful and free source of energy, and in 2012 their reputation was tarnished when Sol Milin was involved in a court case with Dick Smith, founder of the Australian Skeptics. Due to this uncertainty and scepticism the Joe Cell has become the centre point of many conspiracy theories claiming potential inventors of water powered cells around the world are being intimidated to abandon their research by powerful governments and counter movements. Information for this article was sourced from a posting on the Gumtree blog.