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Found 9 results

  1. Amidst skyscrapers and bustling cities, gardening seems almost a thing of the past. Not anymore. A new trend is hitting cities throughout North America, and it just might be what your business needs. Rooftop gardens are interesting, environmentally-friendly, and even a little edgy. Even if you don’t own a restaurant, your business could benefit from your own rooftop garden. Rooftop Garden Benefits When you think of a successful business, a rooftop garden probably isn’t the first quality that comes to mind. So why are businesses choosing to incorporate them? There are several reasons. Uses unused space In an urban setting, there’s little room to enjoy a garden—and purchasing land for gardening is expensive. Yet your roof is just sitting in the sky, teeming with possibilities. Why not put that space to use? Reduces pollution Rooftop gardens aren’t just great for your business; they’re great for residential roofs. The National Research Council of Canada estimates that a large number of rooftop gardens in an area could decrease smog and heat stress and lower energy consumption. Not only will this help the city where you live or work, but it could also increase your business. Many customers love companies that strive to be environmentally conscious. Lowers utility bills Plants provide a natural form of roof insulation, meaning they help lower your heating and cooling costs. Provides entertainment and relaxation The best part about a rooftop garden? Human interest. Customers will flock to your garden—and your business—as a place to relax and enjoy themselves. In a busy, polluted city, a rooftop garden offers a sigh of relief. How to Start a Rooftop Garden If you’re thinking seriously about a rooftop garden, first consider your business’s roof. It needs to be flat so the plants can sit comfortably, and customers can safely walk on it. It also needs to be sturdy enough to support the weight of the plants. You’ll want to check with a roofing contractor to determine whether your roof can support a garden. There are three different types of rooftop gardens: Extensive Green Roof: supports mosses, herbs, grass and other plants requiring inexpensive, shallow soil. Semi-intensive Green Roof: supports shrubs, bushes, and herbaceous plants, with a deeper soil layer. Intensive Green Roof: supports a wide variety of plants and trees with a deep soil layer. If you know your roof is safe for any of these types, you’ll next need to know where to put your plants. Containers are the most obvious choice, but some rooftop gardens grow their plants in rows of soil, just as typical gardens do. If you use containers, keep in mind that clay, cement, and terra cotta pots are all very heavy and will add to the weight on your roof. On the other hand, plastic and synthetic containers can’t support tall plants and may get knocked over in the wind. Your choice depends on which plants you keep, and how windy conditions are on top of your roof. Once you have sturdy containers, it’s time to choose your plants. You’ll need plants that can withstand heat, since rooftops are closer to the sun. You’ll also want plants that don’t require much soil. Herbs and vegetables are always great choices. Now, get your hands on high quality soil and fertilizer. You’ll need to fertilize your plants about every 2 to 3 weeks and water them regularly. Depending on the types of plants, you may need to prune them and eliminate pests. Rooftop Garden Wonders Are rooftop gardens successful? Just ask the dozens of businesses that are trying it. Many people are finding that rooftop gardens are a great addition. Make sure you’ve evaluated all the costs before you plow forward. To see if your business’s roof can handle a rooftop garden, speak with the roofing contractors at Century Roofing Limited.
  2. Learning earth-friendly habits at a young age can set your kids up for a lifetime of environmental awareness and a healthy mindset. As a parent you help your kids understand the world around them, and teaching them to care for it and to be considerate of their surroundings is a great way to help them in their future. Help them understand the concept of earth-friendly habits using these activities and other ideas. Go Camping Instill a love of nature in your kids by going camping on a regular basis. Maybe you encourage scouting trips or go as a family every summer. During your camping trips, talk about how litter and garbage can make plants and animals sick, and how to build fires by only using dead, fallen wood. This is a great opportunity to explore wildlife, talk about taking care of nature, and living green. Visit a Recycling Center Take your kids on a field trip to your local Main Street Fibers recycling center. Teach them about recycling and how it helps the Earth stay healthy. After your trip, go home and show them how to sort recyclables and discuss reducing, reusing and recycling. Make Recycled Art Show your kids that reusing materials can be a great way to help the environment, and a wonderful way to create artwork or new useful containers. There are many art projects that can be created using plastic shopping bags, string, wire coat hangers, and more. Your kids will have a blast, and will learn about reusing materials to keep them out of landfills. Plant a Garden Give your kid a spot in your backyard, or a window planter where they can grow their own plants. Talk with them about how plants help produce clean oxygen, and how planting an organic garden can help plants stay healthy and happy. Giving them their own spot in the garden and making it their responsibility not only teaches them a useful skill, it can also help them learn to love taking care of the Earth. Praise them for jobs well done, and your kids will learn to love the sense of accomplishment they get with each new vegetable or herb. Adopt a Public Place Find a park or other public land that is victim to a lot of litter. Make this place your family's spot to go and clean up together. Your kids will have fun taking care of a public place, and they will develop a passion against litter and harmful dumping. Teaching your kids Earth-friendly habits now can help them see the importance of taking care of the Earth in which we live. Use these great activities to help your kids understand the value of their contributions to the health of the Earth, and that living green can really make a difference.
  3. Composting is the perfect way to replenish your garden with natural minerals and nutrients. It allows you to not only give back to the Earth, but to fertilize your garden without adding all those harmful chemicals. Here are some tips to help you get started. What Not To Compost What you don’t add to your compost pile is just as important as what you should add. One of the biggest things you want to avoid placing into your compost pile are fruit peels. Orange peels, banana peels, and peach peels may contain pesticides. Because it can be difficult to tell if any pesticides are on them, you should leave them out of your compost pile. Additionally, you want to avoid any meat, bones, or fish. These can attract pests and cause your compost to smell. Green Material When composting, you need a balance of green and brown material. Green material consists of grass clippings, table scraps, and manure. The nitrogen you need for your compost is found in the green material. If you do choose to add grass clippings to your compost pile, it is important you make sure there are no chemicals on the grass clippings. This can cause your plants to become diseased. Brown Material Just as you need green material in your compost, you also need brown material. Brown materials often include paper products, straw, wood chips, ash, and hay. Make sure there is no ink on your paper products when placing them into your compost pile. Brown materials are important because they contain carbon and make the soil more nutrient rich. Healthy Balance Now that you know what types of products and materials can be composted, it is important to understand the mixture of these two. Because all products decompose at a different rate, you want to make sure you have an even weight of brown materials and green materials. While storing your compost, you want to keep the green materials on the bottom and a layer of brown material on the top to keep the flies and insects away. It also helps control the odor surrounding the compost. You can also visit your local Central Farm and Garden store to get some soil to help mix in with your compost if needed. As the landfills fill up with recyclable materials, it is important to do your part in making the environment better. As you do this, you are also helping to condition your soil and help your plants grow healthier.
  4. How To Decorate Garden With Furniture?

    I have big garden and want to decorate it. please suggest me better ideas for garden
  5. Carrots are one of the most enjoyed and widely used root crops all around the world. Maybe this is so because the veggie grows easily and you can use it in many ways in your dishes. They are one of the most important cooking ingredient in some cultural cuisines and are the second most popular vegetable after the potato. The colour we usually connect carrots with is the orange, but there are more - red purple, white and blue. Its way has started from Persia and has conquered the whole world. Today the biggest producer is China with almost 46% of the global output, followed by Russia and the United States. There are some very good reasons why this veggie is so liked around the world. Dare to take advantage of all its positives! 1. Healthier Skin There is a big quantity of Vitamin A in the crunchy vegetable and the combination with antioxidants protects your skin from the harmful sun rays. Low levels of Vitamin A in the body can cause dryness of the nails, skin and hair. A half cup of carrots provides 210% of the daily dose of Vitamin A, 6% Vitamin C, 4% of Calcium. 2. Slows Down Aging Carrots are full with beta-carotene, it acts as an antioxidant to the cell dissolution. Well known fact is that it helps with the slowdown of the aging cells. 3. Protects Your Mouth And Teeth The crunchy vegetable can clean your mouth and teeth. It scrapes away the plaque and the little food parts likewise the toothpaste and the toothbrushes. All the minerals in the carrot work against the tooth damage. It stimulates glands and gums to produce more saliva to balance the formation of cavity bacteria. 4. Reduces The Cholesterol It is a good idea to put more carrots in your diet or daily menu because it reduces the levels of cholesterol in the body. Many studies conclude that a dose of carrots can prevent problems related with heart diseases. The high amounts of fiber and pectin in it - are capable to reduce the blood cholesterol levels just in three weeks. All you need to do is just eat a cup of raw carrots every day. 5. Reduces The Risk of Cancer The vegetable is recommended as a natural fighter against lung, breast and colon cancer. The alpha-carotene and the falcarinol can protect you from these insidious diseases. 6. Keeps The Vision Sharp If you have existing problems with the vision, carrots won’t cure them, but they can protect you from sight issues provoked by the deficiency of Vitamin A. There is a study showing that people who consume big amounts of beta - carotene have 40% lower risk of macular degeneration than those who eat little. 7. Prevents Diabetes The plant is good for the regulation of the blood sugar because of the existence of carotenoids in it. Carrots can regulate the amount of glucose and insulin in our bodies, thus providing healthier and more functional life for diabetic patients. Even more - carrot juice can help you with the gastrointestinal and stomach health. 8. Stops Memory Loss And Keeps The Brain Healthy Carrots are very beneficial for the middle-aged people. The beta-carotene in it protects the central nervous system against aging. A study shows that eating just one carrot a day can reduce the risk of having a stroke with 68%. Nowadays the majority of carrots come from China, they are exported all around the world to become part of our delicious dishes. However, there is a great pleasure to dine on a salad you have grown in your own veggie garden. If you are not an experienced gardener, but full of willingness to learn how to grow this plant, then you can always search the expert assistance of vetted gardeners. They will help you with the first steps of planting, growing and caring for this extremely salutary vegetable.
  6. Creating a garden or flowerbed that can come back for a season or two is a talent that requires not only a green thumb but soil and compost rich in nutrients and minerals. For the gardener who wishes to create their own compost, the process is easy and can save money on mulch or other store bought soils. Creating Compost When creating a compost pile, choose a spot in the yard that will not be disturbed by animals or children. This spot should be near the waterspout, but not so close it gets washed away. It should be relatively dry, unless there is rain and it would be ideal if there were shade in this spot as well. It will keep the compost pile cool while completing the decomposition process. Some gardeners choose to create their compost in a wooden box to keep it separated from the dirt. The box makes stirring the compost easier because it is in a separate container. Compost Materials Once the spot and container for the compost is chosen and built, choose the materials that will be placed into the compost pile. Typically, these include any unused fruits, peels, vegetable left overs, lawn clippings, dry dead leaves, any tree waste, like branches and twigs, and leftover coffee beans. Some gardeners use the remains of stalks and husks to help with the decomposition. After all the materials are placed into the container, water is used to wet everything. Then the compost pile is left alone to decompose. Optional Covering Covering the compost pile is also a good idea. It will keep bugs and other animals out of the pile and will allow the water to keep the waste moist enough to continue the decomposition throughout the year. A tarp, which can be purchased at any farm or garden online store, can be used to keep the pile exactly the way the gardener wishes. It will also help keep the smell of the decomposition in the container and not disturbing the gardener. Time Frame The decomposition of the materials depends upon how much heat and water is used in the pile. It can take anywhere from three months to a few years for the pile to decompose. If the decomposition of the pile is needed quickly, placing a few items into the box will start the process, allowing the gardener to have some compost when they need it. You can also find products like fertilizers that can speed the process up at places like Nature Safe. Creating a compost pile does not need to be difficult or overly-complicated. Using these easy steps will help create compost that will nurture a garden for several seasons.
  7. Herb gardening is as easy as the fresh herbs are flavorful. Small flower beds, vertical spaces, and even odd corners can be turned into a productive herb garden with these helpful hints and inspirational ideas. If you don’t want to do all the initial digging and planting work, a local Utah landscaping company would be glad to do the ground-breaking work for you, and help make your herb garden idea a reality. Small Spaces Apartment and condo dwellers that have small outdoor spaces can still enjoy the satisfaction of growing an herb garden. As long as there is some type of sunny outdoor space, such as a porch, or accessible roof top, there is the opportunity for planting a container garden. Select a location that receives bright sunlight for 4-5 hours a day to place your planting containers. Fill them with a good quality potting soil mixture and mix in some slow release, granulated fertilizer into the soil. Start the herbs of choice from seeds and place them in a small container of water (use separate containers for each seed variety), then place the containers in the refrigerator for 48 hours. This cold water soak will cause the tiny herb seeds to germinate quicker. Drain seeds, and plant in prepared soil. Keep soil moist and seeds will germinate in 4-7 days. Container Companion Planting Herbs make excellent container companions for other garden favorites like tomatoes and flowers. Select planters large enough to accommodate the root system of the plants, and place a tomato plant in the center of the container with oregano and chives seeds tucked in around the sides. Basil and cilantro make good growing companions for a pepper plant, and the mixed containers are interesting to look at wherever you place them. Containers will dry out quickly, and the growing plants will need a steady supply of water and food. Water daily during the heat of summer and feed plants weekly with a water soluble plant food. Grow Vertical Decorative and space-saving, a vertical herb garden is an easy DIY project. If you have an exterior wall or fence you can plant and grow herbs of your choice upon the structure. Just attach any type of individual planting containers in an upright position on the vertical wall, low enough so that herbs can be tended and harvested as needed. Create a decorative vertical pattern with the containers, then fill them with good quality potting soil that has a good fertilizer mix, then plant herb seedlings or seeds of your choice. Give seeds a cold soak as described above prior to planting and water vertical container daily. Odd Spaces Herbs have shallow roots and are happy growing in most any location as long as they receive 4-6 hours of direct sunlight, and the soil is kept moist. Since the plants are easy to please, think outside the garden plot and look for odd spaces in which to plant and grow your favorite herbs. An old tree stump can become a prime growing location. Hollow out the stump center, fill with good quality potting soil, and plant seedling or seeds. Suspend a window box or two from an easily accessible window and fill with fragrant and flavorful herb plants. Window boxes can also be suspended from porch railing. Tuck in a nice trailing vine, such as a petunia, in the window boxes for some extra flowers and color. Herbs are easy to plant and take care of, even year round. No matter what your outdoor space looks like, you can find a way to make it a happy place for herbs of all kinds.
  8. Paper bags can be recycled and repurposed in numerous ways, and some of the most advantageous uses can help keep your garden in tip-top condition. Here are a few ways in which your paper can aid your plants. Include in Composting Paper bags are relatively thick and highly absorbent, so they make the perfect brown matter for your compost. Dense paper can be shredded into small, narrow pieces, and then mixed in normally, while thinner paper bags can be torn into larger bits and scrunched up into small balls which improve airflow. The paper will break down eventually, so it makes a great material for composting. However, you will want to make sure that all plastic parts – such as handles – are removed. You should also avoid using bags which use anything other than soy-based inks. Block out the Weeds Open up your paper bags so they cover a large area, and then use them to stop weeds from infesting your garden. All you need to do is remove the top layer of soil – working around plants – and then lay sections of paper over the bare ground. You can then cover this layer with a few inches of mulch, compost, or any other organic material. This will help stop weeds coming through, and it’s a far cheaper solution than using shop-bought weed-blockers. The paper will eventually break down naturally, but give the soil a good tilling during early autumn to help it on its way. Protection from the Cold Most garden plants are hardy enough to last out the winter, but freezes have the potential to either damage or kill them. The best – and easiest – way to ensure that a cold snap doesn’t do away with your garden involves simply tying a paper bag around the top of the plant. This acts as insulation, keeping the warm air in and the cold air out. This is best done overnight. In the morning, be sure to remove the covering. Remember to never use plastic bags to cover a plant, as plastic will damage it. Next time you’re shopping, ask for paper bags instead of plastic, then use these tips to keep your garden looking great.
  9. When it comes to the whole problem with the global warming, sooner or later everyone will realize that we have to do a lot more, even individually, to prevent a major catastrophe that is about to happen. But when it comes down to it, we are a particularly lazy species, and even though we are faced with inevitable threat, we are not so quick to make all the needed adjustments. For example, even switching from simple increscent light bulbs to a fluorescent kind has not happened everywhere around the world, which means that somewhere, people are spending energy inefficiently. It might sound funny, but that is just a small example of how small things can influence the bigger picture. When it comes to taking care of our gardens, there are many thing we are still doing wrong. We spend too much chemicals and pollute the soil, we use excessive amounts of water, or the total opposite – we simply don’t care about our gardens. But, what can be done to truly create an eco-friendly garden? We’ve made a few notes for you to remember. 1. Do Not Be Wasteful This is what being green is all about. Just look at nature, nothing is wasted there, everything has its purpose, and once nature is done with it, it is used again and again, in one form or another. Humans, on the other hand, are not as clever. Humans throw away so much food each year with which we could easily solve world hunger once and for all. The clear solution to this is to think about everything that you do and eat more carefully; the next time you see a banana go brown, do not throw it away – use it to make compost, and all the kitchen scraps can be used for that purpose as well. Composting is adding nutrient rich humus that plants would later use to grow and develop. This is also done to restore depleted soil so that it returns to its normal state. 2. Do Not Be Harmful The next important thing to know is that you should try and do no harm to the existing ecosystem that already exists in your garden. Sure, you are going to arrange it the way you want it to look, but do not use chemicals or other kinds of unnatural fertilizers that can pollute nearby water, rivers and ultimately – oceans, and even damage the plants that naturally live there. Pesticides and herbicides, usually do more harm than good, and there is certainly a better way to achieve weed-free garden – use your hands and physically remove them. By creating this eco-friendly habitat, you will create a suitable place for many organisms to live and thrive, both under and above the ground. 3. Eco-Friendly Can Be Pretty Too Once you’ve prepared everything, you will need to carefully select the plants that you will use for your garden. The best thing would be to use native plants and flowers, because those are already accustomed to your type of climate and specific regional conditions. They will require less care and water to grow, while they will be beneficial for the local habitat. Plant a tree – it will not only produce oxygen for you, but it will also provide you shade, housing for the birds, and not to mention a few tasty apples if you choose to plant an apple tree. Use natural pebbles or rocks or other kinds of decorative aggregates for additional aesthetic effects, as they can create walkable paths and emphasize certain areas, creating the effect you want. 4. Water with Care Water is an especially touchy subject, especially if you are used to turning on the garden sprinklers whenever it is too hot outside. Remember that some regions of this world are still struggling with clean, drinkable water, and you are wasting it. Altering your habits might save a lot of water, especially during hot spells in the summer. More compost the soil has, the more likely it is to keep all the vapor inside, and prevent further evaporation. Soaker hoses use much less water than sprinklers during the summer and provide you with the same results, as each and every drop is directly transferred to the ground, without having time to be evaporated by sun or carried away by wind. Having an eco-friendly garden is not hard as people might think, and the effect it will have is small, but if everyone does it – it will quickly add up.