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Found 2 results

  1. Shocking Facts About Fresh Water

    Did you know that there is more salt water on Earth than fresh. Only 3% of the Earth's water supplies is fresh water and only 1% is drinkable because the other 2% is ice. We use 70% of the drinkable water for farming, 22% for industry and 8% for drinking, washing, cleaning, watering and other home uses. The amount of water nowadays is exactly the same as before millions of years it just recycles and changes it's place which is also called water cycle. Which explains the growth of deserts today and the drastic change of the climate. The water you use today could be used from another person, animal or even dinosaur thousands of years ago. There's even a theory that there are little particles of the big bang in every living being on Earth nowadays. But it's just a theory you decide whether to believe it or not. If you are interested of the life of one drop of water you could study it's life through the years and what you would find is that: It's been 98 years in the ocean. Ice has been its home for around 20 months. It spent approximately two weeks in rivers or lakes and no more than a week as water vapour in the atmosphere. Water could be found not only as water. It has four forms: liquid, solid (ice), gas (water vapour) and plasma. Water supplies which are drinkable, we receive from lakes, rivers and dams. Even the bottled water is bore water which is mostly just packed in nice bottles. 400 litres of water are being used from Australian households. This could be compared to the poor countries where people use no more than 20 litres of drinkable water each day. We consume water with our meal too. The food we eat contains embodied water. The amounts are more than you've ever imagined. For example: to produce dinner for four in Australia for just a single day it's being used around 25,000 litres of fresh water. There are products that require a huge amount of drinkable water for its production. Did you know that it's being used 2,400 litres of water in the production of a bar of chocolate. To grow an apple you need 70 litres of water. There are many other shocking examples but I think these were enough to imagine the importance of water in the production of food. When being just born, the baby's body is 80% water. When we grow up and get older the levels of water reduce in our organism but they are still up to 65% water. Even the human bones contain water. They are about 25% water. The most interesting fact is that our brain is 80% water. There is a huge amount of people who have no access to clean water, which is extremely sad because the statistics show that every minute child dies from drinking dirty water. The bad reality is that 90% of sewage drains into streams and rivers from which we get water supplies for drinking, washing, cleaning and other home needs. There is always an option to do something good for our planet. We just need to develop some habits like stopping the water after watering out teeth brush or while shaving. We could take shorter showers. We can reduce chemicals we leave in the water by using (or hiring home cleaners that use) more eco-friendly cleaning products instead of these commercial dangerous detergents. All these habits must appear in our early childhood year and that would be a great opportunity for a better future.
  2. If you own a home supplied with well water, you are in a surprisingly large company. According to the EPA, approximately 15% of Americans get their water from a private source. But with it comes responsibility. You don’t have a city service regulating your water. Taking short cuts or not knowing what you are doing could lead to bad-tasting water, or even severe illness. You can take several steps to help make sure you and your family keep drinking clean refreshing water. Research Call a local water expert or check the EPA website or a company like Water Systems Council to find out about common water contamination in your neighborhood. Wells can be a source of a variety of contaminants, some are nature-borne, and others are attributed to humans. One of the most common infiltrators is bacteria. Most of these microscopic organisms are harmless to humans, but some, such as E coli could cause serious illness. You will also want to test for water hardness, concentration of minerals, and other contaminants such as pesticides and nitrites, which in high doses, can be dangerous when consumed by infants. Know State Regulations State regulations on private wells vary. Check with your local water expert or local health department for your state’s policies or guidelines on water testing. In some states, you may need to obtain a permit for your private well. Other states require a home seller to pay for a water test and show the results to potential buyers. Your state may also require an annual testing of your well water. IF that is the case, make sure you get a complete explanation on what the results mean. Keep Test Results Keep all of your test records and any other problems or inconsistencies in your water. Check for bad taste, odd color, visible contaminants or foul smell. After a while, you will probably find patterns in your well water, making them easier to eliminate. And showing personal and professional records to a potential buyer will give you some added leverage in the negotiation. Owning your own well can be wonderfully satisfying to a home owner. If properly cleaned, well water tastes better and because you don’t have a monthly water bill, is economical. But you must follow cleaning and state guidelines. Doing so will greatly increase your odds of maintaining a well that will meet all the needs of you and your family.