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Found 9 results

  1. If you want to have a beautiful community, then you should find ways to keep it clean. Unfortunately, there are people who don’t care about taking care of the environment. However, you can overcome the problems associated with having dirty public areas, especially during the summer. Helping a Senior Citizen Clean a Property There are likely senior citizens who have a lot of trash on a property, but without any help, the items will degrade, creating additional pollution in the groundwater and soil. You can talk to this neighbor about cleaning up a property to meet certain health codes, and you can find volunteers who will remove the piles of trash. Local Park Cleanups When your community’s local park has become a disaster zone after a public event such as a free concert, it needs a thorough cleanup. Notify the public about a community cleanup at the local park so that it will become an enjoyable place for children to play. Both children and adults can help clean a local park. Remove Trash from Empty Lots If your community has numerous empty lots where there were once houses or businesses, then the sites can become locations where people dump excess trash. In some cases, paper trash and beverage cans also collect on abandoned properties when there are rainstorms during the spring. Arrange a Saturday morning cleanup of volunteers who can pick up this accumulation of trash so that an entire neighborhood looks better. Clean a Waterway in Your Community There are individuals who will throw trash into the local waterways, filling up the streams and ponds with old tires, rusty appliances and other items. The trash that collects in waterways will destroy the natural environment. However, you must choose a time when the weather is dry so that you can remove heavy pieces of trash from the water in a lake or river. Create Community Recycling Stations When you want to encourage recycling in your community, you can teach your neighbors how to sort different types of trash. First, you will need to arrange dumpster rental so that you can separate plastic, glass and paper items. Your neighbors should learn how to clean and prepare trash for proper recycling. What Else Do You Need for a Community Cleanup? You will need an assortment of supplies while cleaning anything in your community. In addition to trash bags, you should make sure that volunteers wear protective gloves to prevent cuts on the fingers. A volunteer can also use a mechanical grabbing device to pick up trash from the ground.
  2. Is your community a little bit of a mess and want to give back by cleaning it up? Fortunately, there are a wide variety of ways you can work to make your neighborhood green again. Here are a few ways you can clean up your local community, from picking up litter to cleaning up after pets. Pick up Litter One of the best ways you can make your neighborhood green again is to pick up litter. Over time, litter tends to start growing on the sidewalks and pathways of your town. However, you can take some time to pick up litter on the weekends to clean up your community. Consider assembling a small team to pick up litter during the weekend to clean up your community more efficiently. Start a Community Garden Another way you can make your neighborhood green again is to start a community garden. Talk to your friends and family about planting fresh vegetables and fruits in a garden in your community. Plus, this community will help build lasting friendships, while contributing to a greener community. Recycle If you don’t want to pick up litter or start a community garden, consider starting to recycle trash in your home. By using skips, you can ensure that your trash gets reused through recycling. Although recycling might seem like a hassle, recycling waste in your home can lower your carbon emissions and promote a healthier way of tossing trash out. Not to mention, it will help your community as well. Talk to Your Neighbors You should talk to your neighbors to keep your neighborhood green. By conversing with your neighbors, you can promote living healthier among your community. Hopefully, with their help, your neighborhood can stay healthier and live greener as a community. Clean up after Pets Another way you can keep your community clean is to clean up after pets. Not only does this mean your pets, but others as well. Animal feces can be dangerous to the environment, and other animals as well. By cleaning up pet feces in your community, you can ensure it says green and healthy for everyone in it. There are a number of ways you can work to make your community green again. From picking up litter to cleaning up after pets, here are just a few ways you can clean up your community. Hopefully, with the help of the tips above, you can work to keep your community clean, once and for all.
  3. We too often think of the environment as someone else’s problem—automobile manufacturers, oil refineries, and power plants, for example. But we each have a personal responsibility to help keep Mother Nature healthy and happy. We as individuals can contribute to a green, clean environment in more ways than you might expect. The Last Straw Did you know plastic straws are one of the most widespread environmental hazards? According to the article “Straws: Why They Seriously Suck,” more than 500 million straws are used daily in the U.S. Alone. They’re not biodegradable, and they can’t be recycled. But you can stop using them at home and/or switch to reusable straws. Carry reusable straws in your glove compartment and forgo the plastic in your next chocolate shake! Stash Your Trash The fact that how and where you dispose of your trash matters is an environmental no-brainer. You no doubt dispose of everything from paper to yard waste to bald tires. Dispose of those items the right way, recycling any- and everything you can via environmentally aware service providers like Tri-State Disposal. Many of these vendors will even supply dumpsters to safely dispose of large hauls. Single out Single Use Single-use items like sandwich bags and disposable razors represent a huge problem for the environment. You can reduce that problem by a) reusing single-use items, or not using them at all. There are, after all, so many sustainable alternatives: cloth shopping bags, ceramic go cups. You can even buy reusable sandwich wraps. Douse the Old Wood Stove Wood stoves generate carcinogenic particulate matter that can harm not only your family, but the whole neighborhood. The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services lists wood stove smoke as a public health hazard and significant pollutant. The solution? Replace your old stove with an EPA-certified, clean-burning, efficient wood stove designed for complete combustion. Add Your Plants On the positive side, you can add to the planet’s environmental health by plugging in trees and native plants. Not only are they pretty, but they help clean the air. Plus, native plants—i.e., those native to your particular area—conserve water and benefit local wildlife. The bottom line is that the environment in which we live is important. It is not just for the health of the area, but for our own personal health as well. We are all responsible to protect and keep the environment clean as much as possible.
  4. Recycling as a family can be beneficial and fun. Being able to teach children about the benefits of the practice instills good habits and provides a science lesson they never expected. Here are seven reasons why it is important to start recycling as a family. We Can Cut Down on the Production of Cans According to the charity, Wheels for Wishes, there are approximately 105,784 aluminum cans being recycled in the United States every single minute. Unfortunately, 350,000 brand new cans are produced from new aluminum every minute as well. This lends to pollution and unnecessary use of resources. Recycled Cans Have a Quick Turnaround As seen above, there are a large number of can produced. The recycled should be hitting a one to one ratio because there would be little to know waste because recycled cans be back shelves and filled with product in 60 days. Disposal of Recyclable Trash for Large Families Small and large families need a smarter and better way to dispose of recyclable waste to keep their homes and property clean, especially if they have children. Large jugs and copious amounts of cans take up space, but with the right disposal receptacles, families can stay cleaner and more organized while contributing to the environment. Getting large or specialized recycling receptacles is easier than ever now. For example, many outlets for waste disposal like Lakeshore Recycling have become environmental conscientious. These kind of businesses offer a variety of products that have made recycling easy because most cities now include separate waste hauls for recycled goods. Families Can Decrease Air Pollution for Their Children and Grandchildren Saving the planet for future generation is one of the things an environmentally aware family focuses on. Many different materials offer long-term environmental positives. For example, for every ton of paper recycled, air pollution decreases by 60 pounds. Families Can Do Their Part to Improve the United States' Environmental Standing Although the air quality might be leaps and bounds better than China, the United States is the world's number one producer of garbage, despite being just four percent of the global population. Establishing good recycling habits in the home can improve the country's standing in the world. Recycling PET Plastic Can Decrease the Price of the Next Family Car Recycled PET plastics go to build new parts for a variety of domestic and military vehicles. They can be turned into truck liners, fan shrouds, wheel liners and many other parts. The Economy Has Been Rough The Penny Hoarder is a treasure trove of information about how to find collection plants and what items yield cash. There are a lot of different items the collection plants will offer money for, such as electronics, car batteries, copper, scrap metal and aluminum. Aluminum is the most available to families and it considered the most valuable for city services to pick up. Since families have to pay the city for water, sewer and trash services, why not make the money for the bill by recycling cans at a plant instead of throwing them away? The seven reasons listed above are packed full of useful for information and make a strong case for recycling. Doing it as a family passes a good habit on to children, and they will pass it on and expand on it. Recycling as a family will help shape a better planet for future generations.
  5. With the holidays officially upon us, it's easy to get overwhelmed and lose sight of what truly matters this time of year. Amidst all the shopping and festivities, some of the most rewarding acts of cheer this season are performed for the good of one's community. Nothing brings a town or urban borough closer together than small but heartfelt acts of generosity, from volunteering with local shelters and charitable programs to taking extra care to keep things clean and looking their most inviting. In the latter case, here are just a few of the ways cleaning up your community can ring in the spirit of the holidays. 1. Teach Them While They're Young When our children see us taking joy in an act of kindness, they're all too happy to join in! Bundle up your little ones and make an afternoon of cleaning up the neighborhood, collecting discarded trash, shoveling drives and walkways, and making those small but effective adjustments that transform any community into a welcoming abode. 2. Flex Your Winter-Green Thumb Community gardens and parks often fall to neglect when winter hits and the snow begins to collect, which is truly a shame. By clearing paths and walkways, trimming back greenery, and even hanging lights or garlands (where permitted) outdoor public spaces can enjoy just as much holiday traffic and activity as the warmer indoors. 3. Reuse, Recycle, Rejoice You're probably well aware of just how much garbage and debris a household can accumulate over the holidays, and the overflow can eventually spill over into unwanted spaces, considerably dampening the cheer. By collecting, sorting, and properly disposing of waste before it qualifies for snow sledding, you can make way for the real attractions of the season. You should consider having a waste removal company such as Ware Disposal to help remove the garbage and debris in your area. 4. Pick Up For Those In Need Often the elderly and physically impaired aren't able to get out and give their properties a good holiday cleaning, so why not lend a hand? Offer to clear the gutters, drives, and walkways to make room for festive decorations and easier mobility, and pick up any trash that may have gone undetected. It will not only be a great help to your neighbor, but spread the best kind of holiday cheer. Whether it's sweeping an elderly neighbor's walkway or tidying up the public park, taking some time out of your busy holiday schedule to give your community a boost goes a long way to ensuring a happy, healthy season for all.
  6. There's no question that the earth is important. It's where we live, work, and raise our families. Sometimes issues like pollution and environmental responsibility seem too big to address. After all, we are talking about the entire world! The best that you can do to address these issues is to begin on your local level. Check out these five ways that you can encourage environmental safety and responsibility in your community. Education Education is crucial to the beginning of any environmental program. You should be sure to teach your own family how to be responsible, as well as share ideas and materials with your local schools and universities. Most importantly, educate yourself on what you can do every day to make a difference. Start or Join a Program Education doesn't stop in schools. If your town doesn't already have a recycling program in place, be prepared to present ideas to local councils. If you starting clean-up programs seems out of reach, research programs nearby. It may be possible to make share arrangements with county recycling agencies or to cut deals with local businesses for time and funding. Group Up Whether you take your family to the beach or attend community festivals, take advantage of groups! The best way to help the environment is to set an example. If you see trash while you are out on a hike or on the beach, pick it up and encourage your family to follow suit. Also, ask your city council to provide both trash and recycle bins for big events. When presented with options, people will usually do the right thing. Encourage Corporate Responsibility You are able to make choices about where the money you earn goes. Do your best to spend your money locally and with environmentally responsible companies. You can learn more about a company's environmental programs by visiting their websites. For example, a good website for this would be The Freo Group. By spending your money at responsible businesses, you are encouraging good behavior and setting an example for your community that can spread rapidly. Use Your Influence Do you own a business, head a book club, or organize extracurricular programs? Use the groups you are already a part of to spread awareness. One person can do much more than you would think. By encouraging good environmental behavior and sharing information with others, your community can improve by leaps and bounds!
  7. Sustainable living is becoming more popular over time. Plenty of people are trying to reduce their ecological footprint by doing things such as eating less meat, composting food waste and using reusable shopping bags. While all of these things are great, creating a greener community will increase the effects of these efforts. Here are five ways to get your community to live greener lifestyles. Eat Local Transporting food thousands of miles increases emission output into the air. This increases pollution, and experts tell us that this effects our climate. Purchasing local also keeps resources in the area and benefits local farmers. Create a community garden! This is a great way to get family and children involved in a project benefiting the residents and environment. Recycling Everyone knows our trash output is too high. Trash sits in landfills for decades before composing, if it ever does decompose. Communities need to have multiple recycling drop off points, and have a skip bin in each location from their local waste management company. Electronics often end up in the landfills as well. This is the improper way to dispose of old and broken electronics. Set up drop off points so residents have a safe way to get rid of these items. Transportation A large portion of the pollution in our air is caused by transportation. Reducing this will clean up the community. Here are some ways to help. Organize a carpool group. Have a walk-to-school program. This decreases emissions and provides exercise times for children. Petition for bike lanes on the roads. Encourage Political Participation Everyone has a voice that should be heard. Creativity is one of the things needed to create greener communities. Getting involved in local politics can make these visions come to life. This is also a great way to get the residents involved. Let them know about local butchers or farmers so they know where to purchase food products. People will participate if they know how. Volunteering People who volunteer their time can help create preserve and aid the land. Organize a group of people who are willing to take time and pick up litter along the roads. This is a great way to get children involved as well. Cleaning up the area and streams is beneficial to the land and animals as well. There are so many ways to get involved in the community. The first step is spread awareness and encourage a discussion on methods to better the community.
  8. In an era of information that esteems the progress of science, today’s populous is becoming keenly aware of the impact human activity has on the environment. Particularly and prominently, the decline of the planet has steadily come to international attention. With a cataclysmic global crisis impending, people are left to wonder what is being done. Is there anything proactive, or are our communities continuing in detrimental disinterest? One of the most important variables we can control is our waste output. By mitigating the waste our community produces, we decrease the size of landfills and preserve the earth’s most precious resources. Recycling Communities recognize that most of us can contribute less waste simply by not wasting anything. The average household produces over four pounds of garbage daily. It is becoming more and more important for everyone to pay attention to what is being thrown away. Some of these efforts have been put to good use by recycling plants. Recycling plants are established specifically to reuse resources such as paper, cardboard, and plastic. Companies like Lakeshore Recycling are even making an effort to make it more convenient and easy to recycle by providing bin rentals to communities and private companies alike. Ascribing to a Lifestyle Part of recycling effectively, is making it a part of a daily lifestyle. Families toady are constantly looking for different forms of recycling. Rather than allowing old clothes to go to waste, communities consider passing them on to another, and online sellers and purchasing make it easy to get rid of and recycle old materials all over the world. This way less is contributed to landfills, and more waste is reduced. Families also purchase items that are eco-friendly, such as reusable shopping bags, rechargeable batteries, washable water bottles and other items that have been recycled. A Call to Action Communities are willing to respond to good information about causes that matter. This is what is happening across many communities in the United States. As we encourage more people to live eco-friendly lifestyles, and make them aware of the waste that they produce and how it has compromised the planet, people are willing to listen and change their behavior. Information and education is key. With the internet as pervasive as it is, communities are able to spread information and make their causes known and more easily fought for. Leading an eco-friendly life, and finding better, easier ways to recyle is all a part of how communities today are changing and becoming more aware of limited resources. We are concerned with the sort of world we are leaving for our children and grandchildren. By reducing our landfill waste, they will not be plagued with a dying world.
  9. CLIMATE CHANGE DIALOGUES: DENIALISTS AND THE DISADVANTAGED Megan Bonetti | Australia: Brisbane Recently I had a conversation with a close friend on climate change. The discussion captivated me with the multilayered tensions of the global north and capitalist ideologies that doggedly influence the very present concern of global warming and relating social policy. Amongst a general catch-up I queried my friend’s thoughts on climate change issues. His stark and unexpected response, “we evolve, we move on.” …Excuse me? I admired the honesty. His was a real-world response of neo-liberal thought. It was brutal and it was heartless. At least he had the guts to say what many are thinking (Cook, 2014). The social worker in me petitioned him with the human impacts: African farmers encumbered by draught (Dube et al., 2013; Kurukulasuriya et al., 2006; Mayer, 2013), Pacific Islanders inundated by sea water (IPCC, 2014; PIANGO, 2014, Duvat, 2013), people leaving their homelands due to ever-increasing health and environmental dangers (National Geographic, 2015; UNHCR, 2011). Again, he fires back with “survival of the fittest” rhetoric. Unfortunately the climate movement has failed to gain the widespread appeal needed to pass significant climate policy and practical reform (Bullard & Müller, 2012). Industrial giants continue to produce and pollute and people like my friend; devalue the real catastrophe that is climate change (Amnesty International, 2014, 2015; Cook, 2015). While global aid organisations declare humanitarian catastrophe as a result of manmade pollution, industrial conservatives spin myths of global evolution and adaption (IPCC, 2014; Cook, 2014; UNFCCC, 2015). Local, national and global repetition of climate change catastrophe does not seem to be creating a civilizational wake up call. Moreover messages delivered in the language of fires, floods, droughts and extinction must not be blatant enough to be convincing (Klein, 2014; McKinnon, 2014). So if individuals, like my friend, and carbon emitters like, AGL energy aren’t listening, what can we do (CER, 2015, Garnaut, 2011)? Upon hearing my friend’s response to climate change I felt the need to blame him and many like him for their self-righteous ideologies that have significantly impacted the global poor (Böhm, 2012). However, history shows that the human race is really good at pointing blame. Years earlier I too was reluctant to participate in the climate conversation. The debate seemed wonky with excessive jargon. Yet I was unwittingly converted from the influences of a conservative upbringing to that of a less traditional “tree-hugger.” So, how did this happen? There was no halogen light-bulb moment nor was I convinced by the volatile debate and environmental doom. For me, it was the slow unpacking of climate change in a tangible context. This was influenced through a community of people who impacted my values on sustainable living and more importantly did not guilt trip me if I put glad-wrap in the recycling bin. Studies have shown that many individuals and communities feel disempowered or ignorant when discussing climate change, so in response there is silence (Szarka, 2013). Researchers suggest that protecting the rights of those disadvantaged by climate change will only occur when a non-judgemental culture of education and awareness is fostered in the discussion (Sasser, 2014; Smith, 2011). Only when climate change becomes an accessible conversation rather than a heated debate will key stakeholder’s sit-up and listen (Head et al., 2014; Luers, 2013). A movement for positive change in the environment will spread only when people, like my friend, can drop their defences and feel empowered to enter the conversation (Abney-Korn et al., 2013). REFERENCES Abney-Korn, K., Cassiman, S., & Fleetham, D. (2013). While we were sleeping: From dystopia to global awakening. Perspectives on Global Development and Technology, 12(1-2), 80-97. doi:10.1163/15691497-12341244 Böhm, S., Misoczky, M. C., & Moog, S. (2012). Greening capitalism?: A marxist critique of carbon markets. Organization Studies, 33(11), 1617-1638. doi:10.1177/0170840612463326 Bullard, N., & Müller, T. (2012). Beyond the green economy: System change, not climate change. Development, 55(1), 54-62. doi:10.1057/dev.2011.100 Dube, S., Scholes, R. J., Nelson, G. C., Mason-D'Croz, D., & Palazzo, A. (2013). South african food security and climate change: Agriculture futures. Economics, 7(35), 0_1. Duvat, V. (2013). Coastal protection structures in Tarawa Atoll, Republic of Kiribati. Sustainability Science, 8(3), 363-369. Retrieved, April 29, from http://link.springer.com.ezp01.library.qut.edu.au/article/10.1007%2Fs11625-013-0205-9 Head, L., Adams, M., McGregor, H. V., & Toole, S. (2014). Climate change and Australia. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 5(2), 175-197. doi:10.1002/wcc.255 National Geographic. (2015). Education: Climate Refugee. Retrieved from http://education.nationalgeographic.com.au/education/encyclopedia/climate-refugee/?ar_a=1 Australian Government. (2015). Clean Energy Regulator: National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting. Retrieved from http://www.cleanenergyregulator.gov.au/National-Greenhouse-and-Energy-Reporting/Pages/default.aspx Klein, N. (2014). This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. Climate Change. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster. Garnaut, R. (2011). Garnaut Climate Change Review – update 2011: Australia in the Global Response to Climate Change. Retrieved from http://www.garnautreview.org.au/update-2011/update-papers/up6-carbon-pricing-and-reducing-australias-emissions.pdf Cook, J. (2015). Explaining Climate Change Science & Rebutting Global Misinformation. Retrieved from http://www.skepticalscience.com/climate-change-little-ice-age-medieval-warm-period.htm Amnesty International. (2015). Nigeria: Hundreds of Oil Spills continue to Blight Niger Delta. Retrieved from https://www.amnesty.org/en/articles/news/2015/03/hundreds-of-oil-spills-continue-to-blight-niger-delta/ Amnesty International. (2014). Five Countries Vulnerable to Climate Change. Retrieved from http://www.amnesty.org.au/features/comments/35603/ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (2014). Summary for Policy makers- Climate Change 2014: Impacts, adaptation and vulnerability. Retrieved, March 1, from http://ipcc-wg2.gov/AR5/images/uploads/IPCC_WG2AR5_SPM_Approved.pdf Kurukulasuriya, P., Mendelsohn, R., Hassan, R., Benhin, J., Deressa, T., Diop, M., Dinar, A. (2006). Will african agriculture survive climate change? The World Bank Economic Review, 20(3), 367-388. doi:10.1093/wber/lhl004 Luers, A. (2013). Rethinking US climate advocacy. Climatic Change, 120(1), 13-19. doi:10.1007/s10584-013-0797-1 Mayer, A. (2013). Climate change already challenging agriculture. Bioscience, 63(10), 781-787. doi:10.1525/bio.2013.63.10.2 McKinnon, C. (2014). Climate change: Against despair. Ethics & the Environment, 19(1), 31-48. doi:10.2979/ethicsenviro.19.1.31 Pacific Islander Association of Non-governmental Organisations. (2014). The Pacific Score on the Millennium Development Goals. Retrieved, April 29, from http://www.piango.org/Publications/publications.html Sasser, J. S. (2014). The wave of the future? youth advocacy at the nexus of population and climate change. The Geographical Journal, 180(2), 102-110. doi:10.1111/geoj.12023 Seabright, M. (2010). The role of the affect heuristic in moral reactions to climate change. Journal of Global Ethics, 6(1), 5-15. doi:10.1080/17449621003701410 Smith, B. (2011). Doom, gloom and empty tombs: Climate change and fear. Studies in Christian Ethics, 24(1), 77-91. doi:10.1177/0953946810389120 Szarka, J. (2013). From climate advocacy to public engagement: An exploration of the roles of environmental non-governmental organisations. Climate, 1(1), 12-27. doi:10.3390/cli1010012