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Found 5 results

  1. Going green has become increasingly popular in many families. If you’re building a new home, creating eco-friendly opportunities doesn’t have to wait until you’ve already moved in! There are several methods that will allow you to keep your building project more ecologically friendly, making your home green even before your move-in date. Think It All The Way Through In many cases, the biggest waste on construction projects occurs when new homeowners make substantial changes to their plans in the middle of the building process. Take the time to think through what you want before you get started and try to stick with it to avoid excess material waste. Use The Right Materials There are several recycled materials available that will allow you to complete your home’s construction without tapping as many natural resources. Make sure that you’re using the right kind of lumber to decrease your environmental impact. Reclaimed wood is a great choice, as is wood sourced from managed forests. Material Disposal Using an eco-friendly disposal service like Ware Disposal will allow you to recycle materials that can be recycled safely. Not all waste is eligible, but most green disposal companies will make sure those materials are taken care of separately. To go even further, see if there are building materials you can use that are made from recycled or repurposed waste. Save Water Toilets that use less water to flush waste are becoming increasingly popular in many areas, as are shower heads and faucets that regulate water usage. Energy-saving appliances may also include information about how much water they’re able to save, so research your dishwasher and washing machine carefully before making a choice. Go Solar Solar panels are a great investment for your new home that will significantly reduce your reliance on energy providers. Take a look at how solar power can transform your home. Even if you can’t remain off the energy grid entirely, you may be able to significantly reduce your energy usage. Even better, solar panels will pay for themselves over time! Get The Best Roof Roofing materials can have a huge impact on your overall energy usage. Choose materials that are insulating, to keep your home warm in winter and cool in summer, and that won’t transfer heat into your home during the winter. Note Small Details Programmable thermostats are transforming energy usage in many homes. You’ll also find that your windows can have a substantial impact on the amount of energy used to heat or cool your home. Paying attention to these little details when you’re building your house will make a big difference in the energy your home uses long-term. As you build your home, you’re focusing heavily on staying green and being eco-friendly. By utilizing these strategies, you’ll find that your new home can be green even before it’s completed--and that means you’ll reduce your environmental impact while enjoying everything that your new home can offer.
  2. What Is Sustainable Building?

    The sustainable building trend is not just good for the planet, but for the economy — green construction is expected to account for 3.3 million jobs in the U.S. alone by 2018, a 143.5 percent increase over 2015. Green construction involves the design, construction and/or operation of buildings in ways that reduce any harmful impact on the environment and/or on human health. Some of these include reducing the carbon footprint of manufacture, preserving air and water quality, minimizing toxic emissions, and increasing energy efficiency in building operations. Sustainable building also can be economically beneficial. Using green materials and practices often benefits local economies, and the focus on energy efficiency frequently results in significant savings for property owners. The following infographic was created by Accurate Perforating Company and highlights 10 green building materials to consider for your next green building project. green-building-materials.pdf
  3. Many business are going green to benefit the environment and their bottom line. Green building initiatives show corporate responsibility. By investing in these useful tools, you can go green efficiently and make investments that could ultimately save your business a significant amount of money. Solar Panels A building's roof has the potential to either absorb a great deal of the sun's energy or reflect it. One way to create a green roof is to install solar panels. Solar panel technology allows for the collection of energy on sunny days. A connected battery system allows this energy to be stored and used as needed. The electricity that is generated can be used to heat water or to power electrical items inside of the building. Excess amounts of electricity could even be sold back to the utility company. State and federal tax grants are available for companies that install certain types of solar panels. Green Roofs A green roof confers many advantages. It can help with storm water mitigation to eliminate runoff during heavy rains. A green roof absorbs carbon dioxide and releases oxygen into the air. The green roofing materials add insulation and reduce heat absorption through the roof, which helps to reduce the amount of electricity that is required to keep a building cool during the summer. You can even add a patio or access area to a green roof and turn it into a leisure place where your employees come for relaxation on their break time. Delicate Building Materials When you have delicate building materials such as sprayed foam insulation, they need to be kept cool. In a hot environment, the sprayed foam may deteriorate. Some companies, like Powerblanket, know that regulating the temperature of sensitive materials helps keep them safe. Keeping delicate materials at their optimum temperature is important. Insulation Newer insulation products help to reduce unwanted air exchange with the outdoors. Sprayed foam insulation has high thermal resistance values and only needs to be installed once. Proper insulation helps to keep buildings consistently comfortable all year long. Going green in your business does not have to be complicated. You can make one upgrade at a time as your budget allows. By doing the research and making cost-effective changes such as electronic cooling blankets for your server room, you can save money and use the savings to make even more green updates.
  4. When you are planning to build a home from scratch it’s always better to build an eco friendly home. There are many benefits of building a house that is environment friendly, not only is that helpful in reducing the pollution and protecting the environment, but it gives you a safer and healthier atmosphere to live. When designing an eco friendly house from scratch you have to consider three things: building material, generation of alternating energy, and using energy efficiently. Building Material · Using Anticon Roof Insulation Anticon is a great material to use for insulation purpose in roof. There is a unique property of this substance that combines two forms of insulation effectively. In anticon there is a reflective foil facing, which is adhered to a glass wool blanket. Due to foil facing 95% of the heat radiations are reflected from the roof and this prevents any condensation. The wool blanket absorbs all the noise and reduces the heat transfer in the room. Anticon helps in the reduction in air conditioner running costs, it offers more resistance against fire on roof, and has any more benefits. Generating Alternate Energy · Solar Panels Solar panels are the best way to generate cheap, low-maintenance and eco friendly power for your home. By the use of these panel you harness the energy of sunlight for creating electricity for your home use. This energy is renewable and if produced more than you need, then you can sell it to the grid. You can install these solar panels on the roof tops, in the backyard, or any part of your home that is exposed to continuous sunlight during daytime. · Solar Hot Water System This system combines the booster, tank, and collectors, which heat the water for home use with the help of sunlight. Energy from the sun is absorbed to heat the water in collector and is then sent to the tank for storage. This cycle of heating the water is continued unless complete water is heated in the tank or till the time there is no sunlight. During the times when there is no sunlight or insufficient sunlight, then booster are utilized to heat the water. You can have your contractor install this system in your home. Many companies like Celebration Homes South West, Centex Homes and Eco Housing have eco friendly options you can choose from. Energy Efficient Home · Constructing the home that supports rain water harvesting can help you a lot in future. The water stored this way is useful at many places like in washing machines, toilet, etc. This is a nice way to reduce the water bills and usage of water. · More windows should be located on the north side of the home to capture the heat from sun in winter and keep the home warm in winter. Southern side should have less windows as it would help in reducing the heat generated due to sunlight in summer. · Use energy efficient globes that consume less electricity than any normal incandescent light bulb and has longer life. · Use of laminated glass that has low E range in windows is a great idea. This glass has maximum transparency, low reflection, and high performance solar control. Therefore, it could manage heat in summer and cold in winter. Conclusion When you are planning eco friendly house from scratch follow the above mentioned suggestions to get best results.
  5. There’s no denying that buildings created in the past ten or so years are far more energy efficient than older structures. The older the building, more likely it is to be an energy sinkhole, consuming far more resources than it needs to. Older buildings more commonly have inefficient HVAC, cooling, lighting and water heating systems in place, as well as wear and tear issues: such as drafty doors and windows, leaky pipes, and worn insulation (if there is any at all). Many articles and much attention has been given to the easy fixes regarding these buildings. Updating lights to CFL or LED lighting, installing a smart thermometer, and purchasing inexpensive insulation from hardware stores for attics, windows and walls are all excellent ways to cut down on energy costs. However, with the ever-rising costs of energy prices, and the knowledge that resident and commercial buildings still account 40% of energy consumption globally, it might be time to consider doing more than picking up a few draft stoppers. Today there are close to 20 million home remodels a per year, with up to $150 billion spend on renovations. Unfortunately, this money is generally driven toward expansion and aesthetic purposes, such as replacing worn out interiors. Little is done toward updating the energy efficiency of a building -perhaps due to a lack of motivation, or lack of knowledge regarding the inefficiencies of a particular structure. Some home and commercial building owners might have even resigned themselves to the belief that unless they were to entirely rebuild, there’s not much that can be done, and obviously, rebuilding a structure from top to bottom costs more than most people can afford. However, this thought process is entirely untrue. There is more that can be done beyond easy quick-fixes, and it doesn’t require knocking a structure down and starting over. In fact, it has been proven that completely rebuilding would waste more material, energy, and money than committing to a Deep Energy Retrofit -what renovation companies and contractors are calling the intense weatherization program that saves far more than the 10% to 15% of standard energy efficiency driven upgrades. Deep Energy Retrofits do more than locate energy weak spots in a home and replace outdated systems. Some contractors, in an effort to create a perfectly insulated building, even use laser technology to create a 3D model of the structure - in addition to traditional scanning technology. Every DER involves adding some form of interlocking, leak proof, thermally efficient material (such as TES, a timber-based facade) onto every outer wall, as well as double and triple glazed windows. Both additions will do far more for a building’s insulation than anything store-bought and self-applicable could ever do. Deep Energy Retrofits might also include replacing poorly installed batt insulation, adding ceiling insulation, sealing ducts, and upgrading hot water heaters, HVAC and temperature systems, and all appliances to Energy Star approved machinery. Additional changes might include installing a sealed combustion furnace and improving kitchen and bath exhaust, as well as whole-house ventilation. On average, depending on the size and state of the building, a full retrofit could cost anywhere from $10,000 to $60,000, with many variations. The cost is high, but still less than a complete rebuild, and well worth it: buildings that have been retrofitted can see onsite energy reductions of up to 74%, and carbon dioxide emissions can be reduced as much as 54%. With energy costs only continuing to rise —more than doubling in the past ten years— and the sluggish pace of renewable energy projects, an Deep Energy Retrofit is likely the best option for many outdated residences and commercial buildings. Building updates, paired with a re-evaluation of energy prices and renewable energy programs (through sites like albertaenergyproviders.ca or http://www.papowerswitch.com/shop-for-electricity/ depending on your area) are more immediate, and have more drastic results than investing in unreliable renewable energy sources onsite, such as solar panels or wind turbines, and then rewiring the building.