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Found 3 results

  1. Floor sanding is something that is not generally considered a good DIY project because of the fact that it is not very easy. This, however, does not mean that it is impossible. Many times, amateurs who have never seen floor sanders in their lives do a pretty good job with the right preparation. The following tips won’t make you an expert, but they will surely help you avoid various disastrous scenarios. Here is what you should know: Prepare the room Preparation is always key before doing anything and with floor sanding it is one of the most crucial steps. Preparing a room for sanding can be quite easy. This mainly depends on the condition of the floor surface and the items in the room that you have to remove. The best thing to do is to get rid of everything that touches the floor surface. This, of course, means furniture and carpets. Sometimes, moving a large wardrobe for example, can be quite difficult or impossible. In these cases you will have to be careful when sanding around it. It is also recommended to seal it using tape and thick plastic sheets. Other things you might want to seal include windows, doors and power outlets. If the door to the room opens into the room you will have to remove it, because it will be an obstacle when you want to sand under it. Rent the machines That’s right – you will need more than one machine. One of these will be the big sander that you will use to sand most of the floor surface. The other one is a small handheld edger that you will use to get close to the baseboards. You can also get a carbide scraper in order to get the finish off the corners of the floor. Pick a grit You will need different types of sandpaper grit in order to remove the old finish of your floor. Ideally, you would start with rough grits and move to finer ones. It is difficult to know which grit would be needed to properly sand your floor, because every floor is different. You will have to try for yourself until you find what you need. Change the belts Using the same belt for a long time will make it dull. Using dull sandpaper obviously won’t work and you will not be able to achieve the results that you want. It is important to change the belts of your floor sander according to the recommendations that you will get for the specific sandpaper that you buy at the shop. This is important because it is very difficult to tell when the sandpaper is dull and when it’s actually doing its job. In conclusion, floor sanding is an interesting DIY job, but a very difficult one. If you are willing to go through the process of finding the right floor sanders, renting them, getting them to your home (beware of the weight), preparing a room and spending a lot of time doing the actual hardwood floor sanding, then you should go for it. Otherwise, it is best to put your trust in a professional which might even be cheaper and will definitely be less time consuming.
  2. For eco-conscious homeowners, choosing the right floor is a balancing act of looks, longevity, eco-friendliness and budget. Options used to be thin, but with the market for green goods heating up, there has been an explosion of amazing options. These five flooring choices are the crème de la crème of green building. 1. Ceramic Wood Hardwood floors are all the rage, but sustainably-produced hardwood is hard to come by. Hardwood enthusiasts have found an unlikely replacement in the form of ceramic tile. Through a process of staining and stamping, ceramic composed of recycled material is made to mimic the texture and color variation of natural wood. Ceramic wood is also easier to care for than hardwood, and the colors will not fade when exposed to sunlight. 2. Wool Carpeting Wool was one of the first materials to be used to make carpets, and green homeowners are returning to carpets' roots to find eco-friendly flooring choices. Wool carpeting is spun from natural fibers, does not require any of the dangerous chemicals traditional carpets are treated with and can be dyed almost any color. Wool fibers are comfortable and can last for centuries. If someone in your household has a wool allergy, cotton and jute are ideal natural fiber alternatives. 3. Polished Concrete When you think of concrete, you may think of the dull, uninspiring slab that makes up your garage floor. Banish the thought, for new concrete polishing, staining and stamping techniques have rocketed concrete to gorgeous heights. In addition to concrete polishing, the floor can be given glass inlays and other intriguing details to jazz it up. Concrete is the most durable and easy-to-clean flooring option, and it never needs to be replaced. 4. Recycled Fiber Carpeting Oceans of plastic bottles, frozen dinner trays and more can be shredded, spun and turned into brand new carpeting. Also known as P.E.T. carpeting, recycled fiber carpet is durable, stain-resistant and is often the most economical choice. P.E.T. carpeting once had a reputation for being scratchy, but the latest weaves are quite soft. 5. Cork Cork flooring was one of the first green flooring options available, and it has a few unexpected tricks up its sleeve. Cork is a sustainable resource with natural anti-microbial, anti-insect and flame retardant properties. It is surprisingly durable and can be painted or stained like wood. Whether you choose cork, ceramic or polished concrete flooring, green flooring is more beautiful and affordable than ever. Take advantage of the booming market and make the padding beneath your family's toes a good choice for the environment.
  3. Tiles have a big variety of uses in the home environment. From the aesthetic look they can bring to the sheer functionality they have. And because they can withstand almost everything you throw at them (both literally and figuratively) they can last for a long time. This may not seem as a big deal but eventually it will save you a certain amount of money. And that's always good! But how about eco tiles? Recycled tiles are produced from waste from mines and factories. Don't let this fool you, though. They are as sturdy as a normal tile and can be used in the kitchen, bathroom or hallway... Or just where any tile would be used. When looking for flooring types and you want them to be as much environmentally friendly as possible you shouldn't limit yourself to only recycled materials. In this article we've summed all of your options when it comes to eco tiles, including the other solutions which are eco-friendly, look good and can be easily maintained. Recycled Eco Tiles As said, recycled tiles are as good as any conventional tile. Choosing the right type is also important though. The market has to offer many colours, textures, shapes and sizes but when it comes to material it all goes down to two choices - glass and ceramic. These ceramic tiles are made from recycled leftover material from the production of regular tiles. Manufacturing companies use between 50 and 100 percent of recycled material. Other companies use as much as 30 percent granite, marble or limestone debris in their production method. These debris and dust are left from the granite cutting operation. You can read more about this topic if interested in this article about granite and its uses at home. Recycled glass tiles are produced using a similar method. Again, the amount of material varies between 30 and 100 percent, which come from the glass industry. As an addition to the good impact this process has on the environment, glass tiles have another aesthetic value. A tile made from reused glass brings clear light, an effect which is not achievable with conventional tiles. Organic Eco Tiling - An Alternative to the Recycled Ones Much like a recycled tile, an organic one can be both good for the environment while saving you money. With this part of the article we will look at some of the options you can choose from. Of course, this list is not full. Instead, it offers you the most widely spread and conventional choices you have at hand. Cork Cork is harvested from the cork tree by removing its outer layer. This method doesn't damage the tree permanently and the process is repeated every eight to twelve years. It is used for insulation and most commonly for wine stoppers. Because of that characteristic, cork is ideal as a flooring material. It has a little level of heat loss and is preferred in living rooms and bedrooms because it's a comfortable walking surface. The cork is flexible and it gets back in its original shape after stepping or heavy objects have been on top of it. Alternatives to the cork flooring are bamboo and coconut timber. These have other qualities. Don't forget! Cork is not suitable for bathrooms or outdoor areas where the humidity levels are high. That's because it absorbs moisture. There are finishes which are used to reduce this effect which don't always work as they're supposed to. Natural Stone Natural stone is mostly preferred because of the looks it brings. However, it does have a few features which makes it perfect in certain aspects. First and foremost - its durability. If properly installed and maintained (that is annual resealing of the grout) a floor of this type can last for decades. Paul's Tile Cleaning Melbourne - a company which offers expert tile and grout cleaning in Melbourne, recommend natural stone for one of its other characteristics - resistance to mildew and mould. Don't forget! Natural stone has bad thermal conductivity. In the summer it remains cold which will leave your home cool - a really handy feature. As you can guess, in the winter it will be cold too, which means additional heating will be required. In Conclusion Unfortunately, in many countries eco tiling and eco flooring is overpriced. However, an investment now will save a lot of funds throughout the years. It's all up to you, to save our environment!