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Found 1 result

  1. Al Jazeera English writes about Exxon Valdez and how the massive oil spill disaster still continues to haunt the people and wildlife of Alaska more than two decades later.    "When we heard on the radio that an oil tanker, the Exxon Valdez, had run aground, we just knew it was bad, that everything was going to change," said the 61-year-old commercial fisherman.   For Linville himself, that meant tying up his fishing boat and joining efforts to stop the fouling of Alaska's rich southern coastal waters. The ruptured hull of the supertanker began spewing crude almost immediately after it grounded outside the port of Valdez - more than 40 million litres of sticky, toxic goo.   "They hired everyone and anyone to help clean up," said Linville. "The fishing was closed so they had to do it. We all joined in."   As the slick spread west and south along Alaska's coast, Linville and others were sent to beaches to rescue animals coated with oil. Later he helped lay floating barriers and tried to scrub oil from the shore with soap. Some crews sprayed boiling water on rocky beaches, while others used dispersants to thin the oil coating.   Read it: Exxon Valdez spill effects linger 25 years on