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Found 59 results

  1. In a culture that recycles over 150 million metric tons of metallic materials each year in the US alone, one cannot honestly say that there is no recycling effort taking place. Yet, many people are not aware of the many benefits that can be derived from a comprehensive effort to clean up the environment. Our article below covers several direct benefits produced today by scrap metal recycling operations across the US. Economic Reasons The US scrap metal recycling industry in 2008 resulted in the creation of more than 85,000 jobs and $86 billion being generated in revenue. That same year, the US exported roughly 44 million metric tons of scrap commodities that resulted in a more balanced US trade economy. Production of everyday items such as staples, paper clips, fasteners, jewelry, tools, city infrastructures and elements of buildings themselves all make up the scrap metal industry. Today, the industry is not only good for the environment, but it's good for business as well. Over 450,000 new jobs were created within the last three years at a time when the economy appeared to be in dire straits. Best of all, they were high quality, good-paying jobs that fed money back into a fragile and stagnant economy. Energy/Natural Resources Producing metals from virgin ore is an expensive process--both naturally and economically. However, the recycled scrap metal process not only reduces the amount of greenhouse gas emissions, but it also helps preserve the earth’s precious natural resources. For instance, using recycled material saves up to 92 percent aluminum, 90 percent copper and more than 56 percent of steel stockpiles. Moreover, the recycling of just one ton of steel preserves more than 2,500 pounds of iron, 1,400 pounds of coal and more than 120 pounds of limestone. In addition, one ton of recycled aluminum helps conserve 8 tons of bauxite ore and 14 megawatt hours of electrical energy. Ecological/Environmental Benefits In a concentrated effort to preserve the ecological system, one cannot stress enough the importance of having a comprehensive program for recycling of scrap metals. Being that scrap metals are as usable, malleable and less expensive to produce then virgin material, it’s crucially important to have professional recyclers do the taxing work of removal and recycling according to General Recycling Industries Ltd., one of the many Edmonton scrap yards. All things considered, there are no valid reasons for not recycling scrap metals. The scrap metal industry consistently proves itself as being cost effective for those involved inside the industry and outside of it. But more importantly, as the obvious stewards of earth’s resources, scrap metal processing just may help avoid a possible future ecological disaster.
  2. An Eco-Friendly Christmas

    Christmas is, for most of us around the world, a time for seeing family, eating good food and giving presents, but there is a catch. Christmas tends to leave us with a lot of waste materials. Wrapping paper, food, boxes, plastic packaging, and surprisingly quite a large amount of this is not recycled. Business in particular need to be doing more to ensure that their products are providing an effective solution for an eco-friendly Christmas, which can be worked in with all of your seasonal marketing to give an excellent result. For example; making packaging thinner, including less packaging, reducing the glossy effect on wrapping paper, reducing the use of hard plastics and so on can help to reduce the amount of waste that isn’t recycled. What a lot of people don’t know is that wrapping paper isn’t always recyclable, it requires more specific, high standard machinery to break it down and recycle it because of the glossy finish, and attempting to recycle it in an area unable to do so can result in a fine, and this fine isn’t exactly a small one – in some areas it can cost you £1000, just for your attempts to recycle your wrapping paper. So, before you try sticking the paper in the recycling bin you should check with your local council to ensure that they are able to process and recycle the wrapping paper, rather than you ending up with a problem. What do you do if you can’t recycle it? Well – personally I’m all for reusing, which is particularly easy to do if you have kids; after all they’re happy to do crafts with an bits of scrap paper or material you might have lying around; so giving them something pretty and shiny like wrapping paper will open a whole new range of creative possibilities for your children. Of course it isn’t great that more than half of our Christmas fails to be eco-friendly, and even if you are able to make up for the failings of the companies responsible there should be more done to ensure that our annual festivities aren’t creative a problem for our environment. Companies producing wrapping paper should be making moves to make them a more eco-friendly, biodegradable solution, as well as packaging companies doing more to produce environmentally friendly packaging and reduce the amount of packaging that their product do use. These efforts would help to reduce the amount of waste materials in our homes during the Christmas period, and drastically help to promote recycling during this period. There are of course things that you can do at home – keeping wrapping paper that is still usable and using it to decorate boxes, workbooks and so on, reusing it to wrap gifts or even shredding it to use as a protective padding for small or fragile presents during transit, and this makes for a more attractive solution than plain shredded paper, but is not as secure as bubble wrap. There are plenty of options for crafts using wrapping paper, with the range of colours, designs and materials offering a perfect and basic solution for decoration, with the material offering a generally more durable option than some of the alternatives. They make a great option for protecting workbooks, notebooks and sketchbooks as well as a selection of other things. Try creating some interesting crafts with your left-over wrapping paper this year and share with me what you’ve done – I would be very interested in seeing it!
  3. The Funny Way To Recycle Rubbish

    All grown people sooner or later come to the conclusion that life is a game. Depending on your mindset, you can consider this as a positive or a negative assumption. But let's try to see things from the bright side now. When you're playing a game – outdoors or on your computer, you don't take things too seriously. Thus, the importance of your activity is dramatically reduced and the chance to get the job done increases. This principle is the foundation of what experts today call 'gamification' or making a particular job more fun. See how recycling and waste management can be successfully gamified as well. Gamification: Theory & Practice First, let's examine the concept of gamification a little bit more in-depth. The trick is to achieve a game-like experience in a non-game, real-life environment or situation. Of course, this is done using techniques and ideas directly taken from the science of playing: be it electronic games or classic sports played outside. Gamification is proven to be a working yet not aggressive method to make people more engaged with a given activity and make them behave in a desired, predicted way. Turning tasks into game is quite useful in the fields of problem-solving and chores management. Jobs that are generally considered boring are transformed to something more enjoyable or even attractive – cleaning chores, rubbish disposal, filling out surveys and documents/forms and many others. Gamification is also used in teaching with impressive results and that's completely understandable as young people today not always have a high motivation to learn at schools. How Volkswagen's Fun Theory Treats Junk Now it's time to see an interesting experiment - a rubbish recycling gamification. It comes from the world-renowned automotive brand Volkswagen. Their project is called The Fun Theory and has its own dedicated website. There, visitors can see videos that show various practical implementations of real-life games. Also, an award is going to be given to one of the selected ten finalists. Voting has already ended but the entries are still available to view on the site. Back on the actual glass junk experiment. The concept behind this example of gamification is that people rarely recycle the glass bottles collected at their homes. To encourage street passengers to return them, the guys at Volkswagen mixed a regular rubbish container and an arcade machine into one device that they called The Bottle Bank Arcade. For added authenticity, the machine even featured chiptune sounds typical to the vintage game consoles. Weird flashing lights were present, too. So, was the experiment a success? Simply put, yes. The results were more than satisfying and the figures - probably better than what the creators expected. Rubbish removal workers from Sydney suggest that the wide use of such gamifications can be very useful for every highly urbanised city around the world. It's also worth mentioning that not only young people were attracted by the colourful bank. All of this was just the effect of making it fun to return empty old bottles. People earned points for every bottle they threw in, which made them come back and actually recycle more. Do you think that gamification can be also used to solve other 'green' issues? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.
  4. Recycling rates in Europe

    Ever wondered which European country is the best at recycling? The graph below shows the recycling rates in each country in the European Union, and the result might surprise some.     Austria, Germany and Belgium has the higest recycling rates in EU, this means they have recycled the largest proportion of municipal waste in Europe. Sweden - my own country - which is known for its good recycling efforts is far behind.    Overall 39 percent of municipal waste is recycled in Europe, a significant improvement on 23 percent in 2001 and 35 percent in 2010. By looking at the graph, it's hard to see how the majority of the countries will be able to meet EU-mandated targets to recycle 50 percent of household and similar waste by 2020. Each person in the EU-28 generates 92 kg of municipal waste every year - with the majority of the waste going into landfills.   How well is your country performing?
  5. Recycled Printing Materials

    Here's why companies should consider recycled printing materials... even for ads! For all the talk of the paperless office or moving business "to the cloud," printed material is still fluttering about as much as it ever was. Just about every business has things that simply must be printed, whether it's contracts and forms or banners, flyers, and business cards. To be sure, trying to reduce your paper consumption by shifting to digital and email is a great way to do your part for the environment. But what is a business to do when, if, and where that simply isn't possible? It turns out you can be eco-friendly even when you're turning out printed matter by the ream... all thanks to recycled printing materials. A few printing services in Sydney are even starting to specialize in producing top-quality results using recycled materials that look as "white" as regular paper despite their "green" pedigree. Here's what you need to know about making the switch to recycled stock for your paperwork. The Benefits of Recycled Paper As obvious as it may seem, too many large companies are still using non-recycled paper for the bulk of their office work. Why is this? Surely they're not intentionally trying to deprive little rain forest birds of a home? Of course they're not, but recycled paper has been surrounded by enough myths it's quite understandable if managers feel intimidated. Let's deflate a few of those myths now. First. recycled paper has come down in price, a lot. While it used to cost a premium, now buying recycled paper is no more expensive than the regular variety. Often times, it's even cheaper. So yes, you can save the environment and the bottom line at the same time. Second, modern recycled paper is just as "white" as the ordinary stuff. To be sure some companies seek out the grayish "raw" recycled paper as a marketing tool -- if you're selling to an environmentally conscious market, printing your materials on what is clearly recycled paper gives your firm a credibility boost. But your office supply dealer or printing service in Sydney will be happy to point you at their stock of de-inked recycled paper, which has the same bright white "virgin" look you're used to. With those myths out of the way, why should you take the time to seek out recycled paper for your printing? Well, consider the numbers. An incredible 40% of the world's industrial logging output is used for paper production... that means for every five trees that get chainsawed down, two of them are giving their lives so you can have some more forms and memos in your in-tray. Recycled paper helps cut down that number, a lot. That's just the beginning, however. According to the group Waste Watch, each tonne of recycled paper saves 30,000 litres of water (used to make paper) plus 3000-4000 KWh in electricity. The paper recycling process also significantly cuts down on landfill costs -- the paper from your old flyers is pulped, de-inked, and pressed into paper for your new ones -- or incineration. (As you're probably aware, creating more waste also results in higher taxes down the line for dealing with it. Thus, recycling may cut your tax bill, if only by a little.) The fact is, modern recycled paper looks just as great and costs just the same as the non-recycled variety. There's simply no reason not to use it, and plenty of excellent reasons to make the switch today! resources: http://www.ecogreenoffice.com/ http://www.wastewatch.org.uk/ http://www.print2day.com.au/
  6. Tiles have a big variety of uses in the home environment. From the aesthetic look they can bring to the sheer functionality they have. And because they can withstand almost everything you throw at them (both literally and figuratively) they can last for a long time. This may not seem as a big deal but eventually it will save you a certain amount of money. And that's always good! But how about eco tiles? Recycled tiles are produced from waste from mines and factories. Don't let this fool you, though. They are as sturdy as a normal tile and can be used in the kitchen, bathroom or hallway... Or just where any tile would be used. When looking for flooring types and you want them to be as much environmentally friendly as possible you shouldn't limit yourself to only recycled materials. In this article we've summed all of your options when it comes to eco tiles, including the other solutions which are eco-friendly, look good and can be easily maintained. Recycled Eco Tiles As said, recycled tiles are as good as any conventional tile. Choosing the right type is also important though. The market has to offer many colours, textures, shapes and sizes but when it comes to material it all goes down to two choices - glass and ceramic. These ceramic tiles are made from recycled leftover material from the production of regular tiles. Manufacturing companies use between 50 and 100 percent of recycled material. Other companies use as much as 30 percent granite, marble or limestone debris in their production method. These debris and dust are left from the granite cutting operation. You can read more about this topic if interested in this article about granite and its uses at home. Recycled glass tiles are produced using a similar method. Again, the amount of material varies between 30 and 100 percent, which come from the glass industry. As an addition to the good impact this process has on the environment, glass tiles have another aesthetic value. A tile made from reused glass brings clear light, an effect which is not achievable with conventional tiles. Organic Eco Tiling - An Alternative to the Recycled Ones Much like a recycled tile, an organic one can be both good for the environment while saving you money. With this part of the article we will look at some of the options you can choose from. Of course, this list is not full. Instead, it offers you the most widely spread and conventional choices you have at hand. Cork Cork is harvested from the cork tree by removing its outer layer. This method doesn't damage the tree permanently and the process is repeated every eight to twelve years. It is used for insulation and most commonly for wine stoppers. Because of that characteristic, cork is ideal as a flooring material. It has a little level of heat loss and is preferred in living rooms and bedrooms because it's a comfortable walking surface. The cork is flexible and it gets back in its original shape after stepping or heavy objects have been on top of it. Alternatives to the cork flooring are bamboo and coconut timber. These have other qualities. Don't forget! Cork is not suitable for bathrooms or outdoor areas where the humidity levels are high. That's because it absorbs moisture. There are finishes which are used to reduce this effect which don't always work as they're supposed to. Natural Stone Natural stone is mostly preferred because of the looks it brings. However, it does have a few features which makes it perfect in certain aspects. First and foremost - its durability. If properly installed and maintained (that is annual resealing of the grout) a floor of this type can last for decades. Paul's Tile Cleaning Melbourne - a company which offers expert tile and grout cleaning in Melbourne, recommend natural stone for one of its other characteristics - resistance to mildew and mould. Don't forget! Natural stone has bad thermal conductivity. In the summer it remains cold which will leave your home cool - a really handy feature. As you can guess, in the winter it will be cold too, which means additional heating will be required. In Conclusion Unfortunately, in many countries eco tiling and eco flooring is overpriced. However, an investment now will save a lot of funds throughout the years. It's all up to you, to save our environment!
  7. Growth of the Green Movement

    The Growth of the Green Movement infographic created by Fast Haul, highlights the roots and development of the green movement in the United States, popular environmental ordinances that have been enacted in certain regions and are now spreading across the nation, and the top ranked "greenest" cities in the U.S. today. Happy Earth Day everyone!
  8. Recycling rates europe

    From the album Random images

    This graph shows the recycling rate in each EU member state. The highest recycling rates can be found in Austria and Germany.

    © EEA

  9. Ever got told that you should off the lights when it is not in use; or to always recycle your used paper? Going out of your way to practice this may seem to intuitive and logical for the preservattion of ourenvironment Well, today you are going to find out why you SHOULDN'T be doing all these.. Lest you start causing environmental degredation instead. Through in depth reasearches at the National Technological University of Singapore, we have concluded that many of such practices are perpetuating the destruction of our mother earth. Watch this video, and you will find out why.. nough said. We dont need to convince you why this has all been a conspiracy.