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Found 3 results

  1. In this era of environmental crisis, we all must do our part to reduce waste. Reducing food waste is something everyone can do to benefit the environment. The sad fact is, more than one third of all the food produced in the word goes to waste, and one billion people could be fed by the food wasted in Western Countries alone. Many people, especially those in heavily urbanized areas, are extremely ignorant when it comes to knowing where their food comes from. In one survey, the majority of urban dwellers did not know that their meat and dairy products came from living animals. Unfortunately, the survey did not query the respondents as to where they did think meat and dairy foods came from, which could give valuable insight on how to improve public perception about food production and consumption. Reducing Retail Food Waste One area of concern with vast room for improvement is retail food waste; the amount of food thrown out by grocery stores and restaurants is tremendous. If you work in a grocery store, you could convince the management to donate unused or out of date food to a food bank. Likewise, if you own, or work in a restaurant, consider purchasing equipment that conserves resources, such as hamburger moulder equipment that measures precise amounts of food so that you don't use more or less than you need. Also, at the end of the day, you could offer prepared, perishable, unsold food to those in need. Eliminating Food Waste at Home There are many ways to reduce or completely eliminate your home food waste. First, don’t buy food you’re not going to eat. Sometimes, for our health, we think we should eat something we really don’t like. Be honest, even if you buy it, you probably won’t eat it. Second, if you have children, be mindful of their portions. Children probably waste more food than adults, simply because they can’t eat a large portion. Many children are also picky eaters, and will refuse to eat food they don’t like. Another way to reduce food waste is to compost; composting involves turning vegetable food waste into healthy garden soil. If you have a yard, consider starting a compost pile. It will not only help to reduce food waste, but it can also be used to grow your own organic vegetables. Another healthy strategy for reducing food waste is to make your own bone broth; rather than throwing out your chicken or beef bones, you can boil them down into an incredibly nutritious broth. This broth can be used in many different healthy recipes. It’s up to us all to take action, and reduce food waste in any way we can. The environment depends on it.
  2. Why is organic waste contamination that bad ? 1.6 billion tonnes of food is being wasted every year around the globe. It’s worth approximately 750 billions dollars and doesn’t solve the problem with world hunger or the economical crisis. Despite the loss of financial and food resources, discarded foods have strong negative impact on wildlife as well. Landfills that consist primarily of dumped food supplies are the perfect feeding destination for all kinds of wild animals, especially birds. The relation between organic rubbish and the population of the birds that feed on it is so strong that removing a landfill causes a chain reaction such as reduction in the population of the flying animals or the cause of reproductive diseases. How come food can make animals suffer ? Such study was made in France. A landfill has been deliberately removed and 49% decline in the fertility among the gulls was measured and confirmed by ecologists. Seems like that dump site has been the prime food source for the flying creatures and after the waste removal the animals have either moved to a better location or some have starved to death. Small part of the organic waste thrown away by people is actually fish discards estimated at 6 million tonnes every year. Even though that is not that much compared to 1.6 billion tonnes, more than half of the seabirds rely completely on the leftovers of the fish, produced by the industry and feed entirely on it. In nature, it’s a commonly seen process for an animal to stop hunting when it is being fed by people. That is how some wolves evolved into dogs and then many dog breeds appeared after experimenting with crossbreeding. Birds are not the only animals that are affected by the discarded organic trash Predators like wolves, bears and leopards become significantly more active if their natural habitat becomes affected by pollution with organic waste. The grizzly population has increased 4 times in 2014 compared to 1970s. Even some of the world’s most vicious predators like the leopard prefer to inhabit areas polluted by organic rubbish which they consume, usually that is butchered animal bodies. The leopards also hunt on creatures living nearby the landfills which you have to stay away from. Their common prey is pigs, dogs, goats and rats that also seek for sustenance at the dump sites. Composting help to solve the food waste issues Composting is the perfect way to fight food rubbish contamination as it is not expensive and can be done by anyone who wants to learn how to do it. It is beneficial as it also helps you save some of the family budget which you usually would spend on buying fertilizers for your garden. Compostable things are divided in two main categories based on what they emit - Carbon or Nitrogen. You can compost stuff like: banana peels, dog food, egg shells, flowers, leaves, peanut hulls, weeds, tea bags, vegetable peels etc. Rubbish removal companies are trying to minimize the amount of organic waste being generated in households by giving advice and raising awareness about efficient waste clearance, especially these operating in London.
  3. It is estimated that seven million tonnes of food and drink are thrown away every year by people in the UK. Approximately one fifth of this is food that could have been consumed, equating to 1,400,000 tonnes in total (the equivalent weight of over 250,000 bull elephants). This is an astounding quantity of waste which has a significant environmental, social and economic impact on both the UK and the planet. Figures released earlier this year have discovered that recommendations to food banks have risen by 163% with more than 900,000 people who require food banks. 50% of these referrals are a result of benefit delays or cuts, leading to 582,933 adults and 330,205 children who depend on food banks to eat. With the UK having the sixth richest economy globally, this number of people going hungry is a real issue, especially with the vast quantities of decent food going to waste. Last year, almost 2,500 tonnes of food was contributed to food banks, which is an incredible figure– but this only makes up a mere 3% of 7 million tonnes of binned food. The difference the food could have made had it not been thrown away would have been great for those in need, as well as to the environment. As well as accepting food donations, food banks gladly welcome monetary contributions, for example Best of Suffolk, a company specialising Suffolk cottages and other holiday cottages in the area recently donated £3,000 to the East Suffolk Food Bank, a scheme seeded by the Trussell Trust. Business director, Naomi Tarry describes that “The ability to feed yourself and your family is such a basic need that needs to be met”. So, contributing to a needy cause can be done so by…? Needlessly throwing away food is very costly as well. Although binning that moulding banana might not seem like that much, it all adds up in the long run. On average, the price of discarded food is setting back the average household by almost £470 each year. For families with offspring, food waste can amount to approximately £60 each month, equating to £700 a year. Intentionally planning meals, writing shopping lists and not getting fooled by offers is a great way to reduce the household waste and the binning of excess food. The planting, growing, harvesting and packaging of food can all immensely contribute to both an individual’s carbon and water footprint. A small percentage of people are aware that it takes a shocking twenty of litres of water to produce a single egg and if you throw that away, you’re basically throwing away all that water. The waste of decent food is presently connected for almost 5% of the UK’s total water footprint. Additionally, wasted food is accountable for a substantial amount of the UK’s carbon footprint. If no food was made futile whatsoever in the UK, the carbon saved would be equal to taking one quarter of the cars of the of the road. To lessen your waste in your home, attempt and make an active attempt to be alert of the food you have in your refrigerator and cupboards and plan your weekly meals to try and use what needs eating before everything expires. By simply not throwing food away, you will be shrinking the impact you are having on the environment and will help save yourself valuable cash.