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  1. Alternative bagging materials have exploded in recent years, and canvas is one of the most popular. This is mostly based upon the fact that it is very friendly to the environment, but canvas’ benefits go far beyond that. Waterproof and Windproof Canvas is woven extremely tightly, meaning that it boasts outstanding waterproof qualities. This is why canvas has been used throughout history in the great outdoors. It may even be made to qualify as ‘marine grade’, in which case it can be used as a sail making material. This is good news for modern shoppers since it provides a material which protects belongings from water, but which doesn’t employ any chemical treatments to do so. It also means that canvas is slightly better for carrying anything which may leak. Extremely Sturdy As well as being both wind and waterproof, canvas is an incredibly strong fabric. This is another reason why it has been used historically for making sales – canvas does not yield easily to the stresses caused by frequent tugs and pressures. Of course, a shopping bag isn’t likely to need to put up with the same conditions you’d face out on the high seas, but canvas’ natural toughness remains useful. Other bagging materials – particularly plastics - can quickly become misshapen due to the constantly shifting weight of heavy items. In contrast, a canvas bag will hold its shape for years to come. Retains Colour Effectively As stated, canvas benefits from a tremendously tight weave. This also means that it retains dyed colour extraordinarily well, even when facing harsh environmental conditions. This makes canvas a solid choice for promotional bags. Nearly all promotional products are chosen based on their ability to remain in use for years to come, providing a constant reminder to those using them of the business which supplied the product in the first place. If you’re giving out promotional bags, you’re naturally going to want the printing to remain clear for a long time, so canvas is often the way to go. Strong, water resistant, and very long lasting, it should come as no surprise than canvas is becoming more a more popular as a bagging material.
  2. Three Incredible Uses of Paper Bags

    Since their invention over 100 years ago, paper bags have become one of the most ubiquitous products on the planet, and they continue to impress in the modern age due to their eco-friendly credentials. You can use an old paper bags to cook popcorn, protect your plants, cover your children’s text books, make puppets, or construct luminaries, and that’s just a small list. Some people have taken reusing paper bags to the next level. Paper Bag Stairs Rachel Evans’ staircase is one of a kind. Upon first inspection you might imagine that they are made of either cork or burled wood, but look very close and you might just notice that they’re MDF covered with stained brown paper. Of course, you probably wouldn’t guess that real wood hadn’t been used. This inexpensive solution made the treads look totally authentic, and Rachel did it all using just the brown craft paper from which paper bags are made, white glue, dark walnut stain, and floor-grade polyurethane semi-gloss. Paper Bag Lamp Shades Perhaps not quite as striking as Evans’ paper bag stairs, one homeowner decided to do something a little more immediately arresting. When you turn a lamp on in their house, you’ll find yourself bathed in the warm, homely glow produced by light filtering through a paper bag. Folded cleverly around and they attached at each end, the paper bag lamp shade looks great even when the lamp is off. Turn it on, and something usually seen as drab becomes something completely out of the ordinary. Paper Bag Wall A man named Duane posted something similarly eye-catching on popular creative site Cottage in the Oaks. Duane reported that he have saved up every square inch of wrapping paper and decorative paper bags for years. Once he felt like he had enough, he began to wallpaper his foyer with them. The result is a fascinating patchwork construction of corporate logos, strikingly patterned wrapping, and odd bits and pieces which would otherwise have been long forgotten. Each piece was stuck down to a patch of wall covered in wet paint. They were then smoothed out and covered in a water-based sealer. Of course, you don’t have to take things that far, but it’s always fascinating to hear about those who have done so.
  3. Each year, over 1 trillion plastic bags are used worldwide. Yes, that’s a 1 with 12 zeros. Most of these bags are used only once, after which they are discarded (only a tiny percentage are recycled). It’s quite hard to imagine such an enormous amount of plastic rubbish, but it’s not hard to realise this is not a good thing. Each of these plastic bags can take 500 - 1000 years to degrade, or maybe even longer, scientists don’t really know, but they’re pretty convinced it’s a very, very long time. These bags pollute our oceans, kill sea life and sea birds, and may be poisoning us humans as well. They also make beaches around the world look very unaesthetic. So how do we tackle this huge environmental problem? We could simply start using fewer plastic bags and reuse any that we do use. This may be a tough sell however. Another solution may be switching to paper bags. But are paper bags really that much better than plastic ones? Let’s have a look at some of the environmental benefits of paper bags. Paper bags are easier to recycle Most paper bags are recyclable. Almost any paper bag that does not contain any plastic and isn’t contaminated with food can be recycled. Paper can’t be recycled endlessly however. After having been recycled 5 - 7 times, a paper bag has to be discarded. If the paper is not or minimally inked, it can then be composted. Recycling paper does not come without its environmental issues unfortunately. Harsh chemicals and significant amounts of water and energy are needed during the paper recycling process. Not as harmful to marine lifePaper bags degrade faster in water than plastic bags and they will often sink to the bottom, whereas plastic bags usually float. Paper also doesn’t soak up pollutants as plastic does. This means paper bags are much less likely to cause harm to marine life. Paper bags hold more stuffOn average, a paper bag can hold more than a plastic one because they hold more volume and are stronger. Although there are some environmental benefits of using paper bags over plastic, neither are very environmentally friendly. Paper bags require more natural resources to produce than plastic bags, and recycling them still requires significant use of energy and water. A better option is to use reusable canvas bags.
  4. Paper bags can be recycled and repurposed in numerous ways, and some of the most advantageous uses can help keep your garden in tip-top condition. Here are a few ways in which your paper can aid your plants. Include in Composting Paper bags are relatively thick and highly absorbent, so they make the perfect brown matter for your compost. Dense paper can be shredded into small, narrow pieces, and then mixed in normally, while thinner paper bags can be torn into larger bits and scrunched up into small balls which improve airflow. The paper will break down eventually, so it makes a great material for composting. However, you will want to make sure that all plastic parts – such as handles – are removed. You should also avoid using bags which use anything other than soy-based inks. Block out the Weeds Open up your paper bags so they cover a large area, and then use them to stop weeds from infesting your garden. All you need to do is remove the top layer of soil – working around plants – and then lay sections of paper over the bare ground. You can then cover this layer with a few inches of mulch, compost, or any other organic material. This will help stop weeds coming through, and it’s a far cheaper solution than using shop-bought weed-blockers. The paper will eventually break down naturally, but give the soil a good tilling during early autumn to help it on its way. Protection from the Cold Most garden plants are hardy enough to last out the winter, but freezes have the potential to either damage or kill them. The best – and easiest – way to ensure that a cold snap doesn’t do away with your garden involves simply tying a paper bag around the top of the plant. This acts as insulation, keeping the warm air in and the cold air out. This is best done overnight. In the morning, be sure to remove the covering. Remember to never use plastic bags to cover a plant, as plastic will damage it. Next time you’re shopping, ask for paper bags instead of plastic, then use these tips to keep your garden looking great.
  5. 5 Alternative Uses for Paper Bags

    With concerns about the environment, shoppers are now being advised to avoid using plastic carrier bags. One alternative to these is paper bags. Once you have accumulated a few of these at home, you may wonder if there are any other uses for them instead of leaving them stashed in a cupboard. Here are five unusual ways to utilise any spare paper bags. Make a Gift Bag Paper bags are ideal to use as a cheap gift bag. It is simple to transform a plain bag into something really pretty. Either tie a colourful ribbon at the handles, ass some glitter or sequins, paint a design or add a collage of interesting pictures from magazines. Let your creativity run wild. Store Mushrooms Most people will have encountered the problem of buying mushrooms in a plastic container, putting them in the refrigerator and coming back the next day to find that the mushrooms are all slimy. The best way to avoid this problem is to put your mushrooms in a paper bag when you get home and this will keep them fresher for longer. Rehydrate Stale Bread If your bread has started to go stale, then most people will usually just throw the remains of the loaf away. However, this is not necessary as it is easy to rehydrate stale bread. Just put the bread into the paper bag, pour some water over the outside and put into the oven. This then creates a steaming effect and returns your bread to its original condition. Clean the Windows A crafty cleaning tip is to use the paper bag to clean the windows. Spray the windows with white wine vinegar and then wipe off using paper bags scrunched into balls. They absorb any grease and leave a streak-free finish. Ripen Fruits If it seems to be taking your fruit a while to ripen, then put it into a paper bag at the top part of the refrigerator. This will help your fruit to ripen faster. There is so much more to a paper bag than meets the eye and there are lots of different uses for them. So, unless you are planning to recycle them, don't throw your used paper bags away, give them a new purpose instead.
  6. Paper bags are not just for shopping; they make ideal storage and props for entertaining your kids. Take a look at our top 3 uses; we guarantee that you with be using at least one of them before the day is out. 1. STORING ART AND CRAFT ITEMS Paper carrier bags are ideal for storing all those craft items that you have in old pencil cases, and clogging draws about the house. Why not use a paper bag to store everything from pencils and crayons, to pots of glitter and glue. It’s even easy to get everything out when your little one is feeling creative. All thanks to most bags having handles for easy transportation. 2. KEEPING CARS AND TRACKS TOGETHER Toys. No matter how careful you are something always goes missing. Especially when it comes to toy car tracks. Why not keep them all together in a large paper bag? Everything fits in easily, and if you use a large bag then you shouldn’t have any problems storing the entire track. Provided you don’t over fill the bag you shouldn’t have any problems. Storage is also easy and should fit nicely into any space between cupboards, or even under the bed. If you have car tracks then it stands to reason that you also have lots of toy cars. Instead of keeping them in draws, keep them in bags. They are easy to transport and you can fit lots of them into one bag. All their favourites in one handy bag. 3. MAKE CHARACTER MASKS AND HELMETS Fire the imagination of your kids with home made masks and helmets. All you need to do is remove the handles, draw a face on the front, and put hair (or antennas) on the top. You can use straws for antennas and wool for hair. If they don’t want a mask then you can also make space helmets for your budding explorer, or helmets for your brave knight. You can even make an afternoon of it. Making the mask and then playing with them. Enough to keep the kids busy on a rainy afternoon.
  7. Hello GoingGreen, welcome to Green Blog! :)