Love 4 Mother Earth

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  1. Love 4 Mother Earth liked a post in a topic by Simon Leufstedt in Was the Sahara desertification man-made?   
    I don't think one can blame the Sahara desert on mankind. The climate and environment in that region has seen enormous natural changes and variations over the last few hundred thousand years. But history does show how mankind have contributed to desertification around the edges of Sahara.
     
    Around 2000 years ago, during the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, one can see how large sections of North Africa, which back then served as crucial granaries for the Romans, were reduced to deserts. A growing demand for food led to soil degradation and the production got extended to ever more marginal lands. Forests on steep hillsides were cut down to make room for cultivation which exposed the soil and made it vulnerable to harsh weather elements which easily eroded the precious soil and left the earth desolated. Overgrazing also interfered with the natural replacement of pasture when herbs, seeds and grasses were destroyed.
     
    This destruction caused severe and chronic food shortages which in turn contributed to a drop in the population and the weakening of the empire. The erosion caused by all this was so severe that you can still see the effects of it today. All the former great cities in Rome's former North African provinces are now in ruins and surrounded by vast deserts.
     
    It's fascinating, as well as scary, to see how the fall of the great Roman Empire can, to a considerable extent, be traced back to environmental destruction. If you are interested in learning more I really recommend The Vulnerable Planet by John Bellamy Foster. It's an excellent book that takes a look on the economic history of the environment.
  2. Love 4 Mother Earth liked a post in a topic by Cosmic Debris in Was the Sahara desertification man-made?   
    What an excellent question!
     
    I think the Sahara was man made.
     
    Timbuktu, Cairo and other areas of Africa, were along trade routes that woul dhave drawn people to the area. Great civilizations existed there before Europeans developed their own urban centers. The concentration of people must have led to deforestation for farming and production. I think there were also gold mines that may have used more than their fair share of water.
  3. rose liked a post in a topic by Love 4 Mother Earth in Infographic: The hidden face of Coca-Cola   
    Soda is addictive, sugar in general is addictive. Sweets. chocolate have an addictive component. You get sugar cravings.

    It's been a few years since I hardly eat any sweets, and never drink any sugar soft-drinks.
    . I think the key to this is eating lots of fruits.

    Fruits are rich in natural sugar, and the difference is: a candy bar will give you a sugar high, and then a sugar low, followed by a craving - whereas if you eat 4-5 bananas, you get a natural high, without the low, you feel full of energy and you feel good and healthy. 

    I think this is the key to kicking the soda habit - getting your sugar fix from fruit, and why not, from freshly squeezed fruit juice. 
    Buy a juicer and drink fresh juice. It will help you kick the soda habit in no time.

     
  4. Simon Leufstedt liked a post in a topic by Love 4 Mother Earth in Was the Sahara desertification man-made?   
    This is topic is not really about Sahara, but mostly about what is happening right now in the Amazon. 

    Massive deforestation is going on in order to provide paper for countless newspapers and magazines, stationery, furniture in the West. The Western countries are willing to pay for all the wood, and the poor Amazon countries are willing to sell their resources for a quick buck, without even thinking of future generations. 

    If this goes on recklessly, what is now the Amazon forest could one day become the Amazon desert. 
    What do you think? I would like to discuss this aspect also. Do you think the Amazon is in danger of becoming a desert.

    With our incredibly advanced deforestation technology, we could create an ecological disaster of massive proportions. 


     
  5. Simon Leufstedt liked a post in a topic by Love 4 Mother Earth in A response to David Attenborough's overpopulation comment   
    I agree. The problem is not only overpopulation, the problem is greed. 
    People who overconsume, who have a huge carbon footprint. Millionaires who have yachts and an insatiable greed. They are worse for the environment than overpopulation. 

    Some Africans live on less than one dollar a day, Ethiopia is hardly overpopulated. It is overpopulated considering the scarce resources it has. That's why people are dying of hunger. A drought comes -- and there is no food, so people are dying. 

    And the drought is caused by the pollution and exhaust fumes from the cars in the West. We are partly responsible for Africa's food problem. 

    Now it is a bit cynical to tell the people of Ethiopia - don't procreate because you have no food.  


    David Attenborough has made millions from his programs. He is one of the rich overconsumers.
    His new worth is 35 million. 

    http://www.celebritynetworth.com/richest-celebrities/david-attenborough-net-worth/


    He probably consumes as much as an entire Ethiopian village. 

    I am tired of these megarich celebrities preaching to ordinary normal people. Like Madonna saying "Save the environment", then getting into her SUV, on her way to her million dollar mansion with a huge carbon footprint. 


     
  6. Cosmic Debris liked a post in a topic by Love 4 Mother Earth in Was the Sahara desertification man-made?   
    I would like to start a topic about the Sahara desert.

    Did you know that only 6000 years ago, this immense area was not a desert, it was a thriving forest.
    Sahara became the desert we know today about 2700 years ago. 

    Some scientists say that it was because of climate change, or a change in the axis of the Earth. But I am not convinced. 
    Why didn't this climate change take place in South America as well?
    Why didn't the Amazon jungle become a desert. 


    Scientist forget that 6000 years ago, the Earth was populated. The Egyptians were a thriving civilization, building incredible pyramids. 
    I think the Sahara desert was also created through mass deforestation. And the same thing is happening right now in the Amazon. Perhaps in a few millenia, the Amazon will also become a desert. 

    What do you think?  Was the Sahara a natural event or the result of reckless deforestation?

    The ancient civilizations were more advanced that we sometimes like to admit. 
    6000 to 2700 years ago is quite recent.