Plastic water bottle advertising campaign from Brita

A currently running advertising campaign from Brita, a German company that specializes in water filtration products, says in its ad slogan that "last year 16 million gallons of oil were consumed to make plastic water bottles."

Brita wants you to stop using water bottles and instead use their water filters to clean their water. While you can ask yourself what use the water filters will do, when the majority of the developed countries have an excellent quality on their water, the advertising campaign highlights one of the most pointless waste products in our society today.

Americans send about 38 billion water bottles a year to landfills. Considering the 1.5 million barrels of oil needed to make those bottles, the environmental impact of plastic bottle waste is truly staggering.

You can check out their site over at FilterForGood.com. While you at it you might also want to check out TakeBackTheFilter.org.

The full images from the ad campaign can be found below:

Brita ad campaign

Brita ad campaign 2


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Simon Leufstedt
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Guest Mr. Sustainable

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Wow! A picture still says a thousand words! Those images are truly phenomenal. I did my part by purchasing a SIGG bottle with StopGlobalWarming.org emblazoned on the side. Together, we can become the change we desire.

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Guest Beth Terry

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Hi. Thanks for mentioning Take Back The Filter! We're collecting used filters and petition signatures, for those who don't know. We'd like Clorox in North America to recycle the filters the way the German company already does in Europe.

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I want to say, Brita filter is also made from plastic. I hope they could also sell filter components, not just sell their filers... So it would be good to reuse the filter again.

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Guest Max

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The only way we are going to reduce our plastic pollution problem is for all of us to pitch in and do something. I think Brita has an excellent idea that can make a difference. We're trying to make a difference too; we've designed a plastic biodegradable bottle that we believe will be better for our environment. The problem is that there are more than 150 billion bottles made each year and only 20-30 percent is being recycled. The rest end up in our landfills, oceans and streams. ENSO Bottles aren't the final answer but it is a step in the right direction. Max http;//www.ensobottles.com "Bottles for a Healthier Earth"

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Guest livetvpk

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Nice post. Thanks for sharing it. I use to buy quality recyclable plastic products for my household purpose by ordering online at http://www.talon-direct.com I found vast verity of quality plastic products here and they are very reliable as well.

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Guest McGarrell Reilly

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The ads photo looks very good, make you think you are drink oils rather than water, like it

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Guest Mark Conlon

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I have been using a Brita for years at home. I think it does provide some help in removing some metals and such from the water. Or I am easily duped by advertising. Unfortunately the filters do not seem to be recyclable. As for the plastic bottle problem. I do not understand people about not being able to recycle. I am certain that I achieve 100% recycling of bottles cans glass. Its quite easy to do. I have seen people stand right beside a recycling bin and instead through it into the trash. I will hold onto a bottle or can until I find a bin or take it home, that isn't hard either. I have to admit I could change some of my buying habits to reduce taking a bottle in the first place by having my own reusable bottle. Yesterday I purchased some reusable plastic containers for frozen foods that I regularly buy in bulk and put into freezer bags. Tossing those bags was bothering me. Little things add up. Most Canadians do put the effort in and recycling is well established so I cannot complain. I hear other countries like Germany have very very high recycling rates. Hopefully Canada will catch up and huge progress is being made. It does not seem that long ago that we threw everything out. I won't discuss how mortified I still am to see litter and lets not talk about why bikes shopping carts end up in the river !!!

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Guest K. Michael

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WOW I will never drink black paint again!  Didn't know I walked around looking like that. 

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Guest D. A. Ryan

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I have to say, I cannot understand the obsession with bottled water. Haven't people heard of a tap? Only a handful of bottled water comes from a "nautral source" (i.e. a natural spring, etc.). Most of it comes from artifically created sources or water mains! If I sat outside with a stall selling cups of tap water at 40p a cup I'd be arrested as a con-artist, but the bottling corps.... The only time I've ever bought bottled water was for the bottle, and I refilled that afterwards from a tap (or when I'm in the highlands a mountain stream).

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