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sorrymom

Species Relocation???

So scientists are thinking of making these drastic changes to ecosystems with species relocation. For example, moving big game to American Prairies, and Polar bears to Antarctica.

But won't that just mess up the whole eco-system?

I'm really partial to polar bears, so I'm really interested in the antarctica idea. I just think that since penguins are not used to surface predators, they'll totally suffer.

But should we just let them die because of habitat loss???

read:

http://www.sorrymom.org/?p=8

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So scientists are thinking of making these drastic changes to ecosystems with species relocation. For example, moving big game to American Prairies, and Polar bears to Antarctica.

But won't that just mess up the whole eco-system?

I'm really partial to polar bears, so I'm really interested in the antarctica idea. I just think that since penguins are not used to surface predators, they'll totally suffer.

But should we just let them die because of habitat loss???

read:

http://www.sorrymom.org/?p=8

:thoughtful:

I'm with you there sorrymom.

It's a tough problem and the fact is that the Antarctic ice is also receding so putting them there is not a long term solution. And yeah, the loss of the sea ice would only worsen the problem for penguins because their habitat would get a whole lot more crowded and full of predators.

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:thoughtful:

I'm with you there sorrymom.

It's a tough problem and the fact is that the Antarctic ice is also receding so putting them there is not a long term solution. And yeah, the loss of the sea ice would only worsen the problem for penguins because their habitat would get a whole lot more crowded and full of predators.

A real scary thing here is that species relocation would require the permission of multi-nations and every environmental group that you can think of. Odds of an agreement, about the chance of pigs flying. It "sounds good" but in reality, never happen.

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Its depressing to see that the climate crisis have come this far that we are actually discussing something crazy like this... :badtaste:

No disrespect intended for you "sorrymom"!

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Its depressing to see that the climate crisis have come this far that we are actually discussing something crazy like this... :badtaste:

No disrespect intended for you "sorrymom"!

you will not see them create flying pigs, that would lessen the weight of the pig and therefore reduce the value. Have to be realistic.... I suspect that if there is an "relocation" the animals will do it on their own...

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you will not see them create flying pigs, that would lessen the weight of the pig and therefore reduce the value. Have to be realistic....

Haha that was funny! :P

I suspect that if there is an "relocation" the animals will do it on their own...

If this was an normal change of climate that took place during thousands of years, my answer would be yes. But the warming is happening so fast that the animals have no time to adjust to the new climate.

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This is a rather interesting idea, but a very complex issue.

In moving polar bears south, there would be issues raised on the impacts to the native biodiversity of Antarctica, since these Arctic polar bears would be exotic (non-native) species in the Southern Hemisphere. There was a time when (albeit less extreme) versions of these practices were the norm; however, based on impressions from positions that they usually take on these matters, it would seem that most modern day conservationists would be unable to support such a measure in principle.

However, some researchers have recently been suggesting solutions of this nature (although in a much more general sense)

For example: http://environmentalresearchweb.org/cws/ar...e/futures/35063

Many species are struggling to adapt to climate change as their preferred temperature conditions shift to higher latitudes or higher altitudes. In some cases, populations are unable to migrate because of natural barriers, such as large expanses of water, or manmade barriers like areas of cultivated land or cities. Also, the organisms may simply not be able to migrate fast enough to keep up with changing conditions.

Now, researchers from Australia, the US and the UK say that moving species that are threatened with extinction by climate change to new habitats could be an important conservation option. “This strategy flies in the face of conventional conservation approaches,†they write in a policy forum in Science. “The world is littered with examples where moving species beyond their current range into natural and agricultural landscapes has had negative impacts. Understandably, notions of deliberately moving species are regarded with suspicion.â€

But the team believes that keeping species within their natural biogeographic region, as well as today’s more detailed scientific understanding, could help avoid some of these problems.“Moving species carries potential risk to other species, as well as benefits to the species being moved, so we have to be careful to weigh up the pros and cons on a case by case basis,†said Chris Thomas of the University of York, UK. “But not to act may represent a decision to allow a species to dwindle to extinction.â€

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The world is littered with examples where moving species beyond their current range into natural and agricultural landscapes has had negative impact.

So, we want to try again and experiment with the lives of animals. If they live, yea for us, if they die(or destroy another species) opps! <_<

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Elephants get relocated from one country to another on a regular basis and they seem to survive just fine. As long as the climate is similar they will adapt. Perhaps not in the generation that was moved, but the one following that (if there is one following that...)

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So, we want to try again and experiment with the lives of animals. If they live, yea for us, if they die(or destroy another species) opps! <_<

History is full of stories where humans have tried to relocate a specie to a new area. It has, that I know, never ended in a good way.

Elephants get relocated from one country to another on a regular basis and they seem to survive just fine. As long as the climate is similar they will adapt. Perhaps not in the generation that was moved, but the one following that (if there is one following that...)

They have? :thoughtful:

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