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burntoshine

Oil in Alaska

I just leanred that there is 30million barrels of oil under in the northern parts of Alaska. I wonder, how will global warming effect the arctic and further its resources? WIll they just melt?

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Alaska is not like the northpole made out of icebergs so the oil is located under the earth and wont melt away.

Wikipedia says this:

Alaska has the largest land area of any U.S. state at 570,380 square miles (1,477,277 km²) that extend west from the southern tip of the Alaska Peninsula contain many active volcanoes. The North Slope is known for its oil reservoirs and extreme climate. The Alaskan Bush is a general term encompassing any remote part of the state.

With its numerous islands, Alaska has nearly 34,000 miles (54,720 km) of tidal shoreline (the most shoreline in the United States). Alaska is home to 3.5 million lakes of 20 acres (8 ha) or larger [5]. Marshlands and wetland permafrost cover 188,320 square miles (487,747 km²) (mostly in northern, western and southwest flatlands). Frozen water, in the form of glacier ice, covers some 16,000 square miles (41,440 km²) of land and 1,200 square miles (3,110 km²) of tidal zone.

I personally think it would be morally wrong to drill for oil in Alaska.

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The thing is, they don't need to. We don't even need oil as an energy source anymore. There are plenty of alternatives. Big Oil is the only one who stands in the way.

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Yeah, but who cares about the nature when you got "green" money to think of!? icon_rolleyes.gif

I hear that it's like everyday is Christmas if you work in the old industry. Unless this part of our economy changes fundamentally, it's rather difficult for us to stop drilling in places like Alaska.

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I hear that it's like everyday is Christmas if you work in the old industry. Unless this part of our economy changes fundamentally, it's rather difficult for us to stop drilling in places like Alaska.

From what I have seen of that industry I would say that is not really true. Lots of hard work and constant research costs.

At this time, we can't stop using oil so, until that time comes, we need to do a better job of getting it out of the ground with less damage to the environment.

At the same time, we need to start spending more on solar cell research. We have got to get the cost of converting solar energy down to the point that it make common sense to build homes that get most of their energy from the sun.

Throwing rocks at the oil industries is not the solution to the problem. :thoughtful:

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Throwing rocks at the oil industries is not the solution to the problem. :thoughtful:

So, you're saying that regulations do not matter much? You're saying that the fair and competitive market place will solve problems? If the solar power takes off, then the oil industry will stop creating so many problems?

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So, you're saying that regulations do not matter much? You're saying that the fair and competitive market place will solve problems? If the solar power takes off, then the oil industry will stop creating so many problems?

  • So, you're saying that regulations do not matter much? Nope, not what I am saying at
    all, we need all the regulations that we have in place.
  • You're saying that the fair and competitive market place will solve problems? No, hardly a fair and competitive market place
  • If the solar power takes off, then the oil industry will stop creating so many problems No, how ever you do have to admit that competition will create a more level playing field that will force the industry to change its ways.

What I am saying is that trying to blame all the worlds troubles on the oil industry is not the solution. Trying to portray the oil industry as "evil" is not the solution. We are going to need/use oil until we can produce an array of alternate solutions, so, that is what we need to be working on. In the meantime, we have to face the fact that we need oil.

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  • So, you're saying that regulations do not matter much? Nope, not what I am saying at
    all, we need all the regulations that we have in place.
  • You're saying that the fair and competitive market place will solve problems? No, hardly a fair and competitive market place
  • If the solar power takes off, then the oil industry will stop creating so many problems No, how ever you do have to admit that competition will create a more level playing field that will force the industry to change its ways.

What I am saying is that trying to blame all the worlds troubles on the oil industry is not the solution. Trying to portray the oil industry as "evil" is not the solution. We are going to need/use oil until we can produce an array of alternate solutions, so, that is what we need to be working on. In the meantime, we have to face the fact that we need oil.

But the most important is what people want. If the biggest part of the world said NO to oil and YES to alternative energies. The oil industry would have to change their business

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But the most important is what people want. If the biggest part of the world said NO to oil and YES to alternative energies. The oil industry would have to change their business

True, however, the biggest part of the world, China/India etc is saying YES to oil. At least Europe and the US/Canada are working on alternatives. The key has to be to get the alternatives cheaper than oil. No one is going to say NO until they have a alternative (cheaper)

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True, however, the biggest part of the world, China/India etc is saying YES to oil. At least Europe and the US/Canada are working on alternatives. The key has to be to get the alternatives cheaper than oil. No one is going to say NO until they have a alternative (cheaper)

I don't know really. There's a lot of talk but not really anyone looking.

China, India and other development countries need oil to grow their economies. USA somehow blindly tries to believe that they need oil to keep their high standards of living. Heck, they even invaded a country to secure their oild dependence.

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I think the bottom line is No one is going to say NO until they have a alternative (cheaper) all countries are in the same boat as the US. they need oil to keep their standards of living, not really an option until the alternative is in place...

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I think the bottom line is No one is going to say NO until they have a alternative (cheaper) all countries are in the same boat as the US. they need oil to keep their standards of living, not really an option until the alternative is in place...

And if they didn't find a solution in a short period we all gonna sunk :o

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I think the bottom line is No one is going to say NO until they have a alternative (cheaper) all countries are in the same boat as the US. they need oil to keep their standards of living, not really an option until the alternative is in place...

No?

When this quiet city in southern Sweden decided in 1996 to wean itself off fossil fuels, most people doubted the ambitious goal would have any impact beyond the town limits.

A few melting glaciers later, Vaxjo is attracting a green pilgrimage of politicians, scientists and business leaders from as far afield as the United States and North Korea seeking inspiration from a city program that has allowed it to cut CO2 emissions 30 percent since 1993.

Vaxjo is a pioneer in a growing movement in dozens of European cities, large and small, that aren't waiting for national or international measures to curb global warming.

http://www.newsvine.com/_news/2007/10/13/1...-climate-change

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No?

When this quiet city in southern Sweden decided in 1996 to wean itself off fossil fuels, most people doubted the ambitious goal would have any impact beyond the town limits.

A few melting glaciers later, Vaxjo is attracting a green pilgrimage of politicians, scientists and business leaders from as far afield as the United States and North Korea seeking inspiration from a city program that has allowed it to cut CO2 emissions 30 percent since 1993.

Vaxjo is a pioneer in a growing movement in dozens of European cities, large and small, that aren't waiting for national or international measures to curb global warming.

http://www.newsvine.com/_news/2007/10/13/1...-climate-change

The problem is you switched subjects, oil so that people can drive cars etc, to energy for heating etc. Since Vaxjo is in the middle of forests it made sense for them to use what was staring them in the face. Do other cities need to learn from that, yes. Most of the others are not living in the middle of a forest so they are going to have to be more creative and invest in other types of energy. Solar may be a more universal source for many.

So, once again, we need to be investing in the research to produce alternatives that can be applied NOW. Alternatives to using gas as a source of energy for cars with totally new designs than what you see coming from the world auto makers.

New ideas for cars

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