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Three Incredible Uses of Paper Bags

Since their invention over 100 years ago, paper bags have become one of the most ubiquitous products on the planet, and they continue to impress in the modern age due to their eco-friendly credentials.

You can use an old paper bags to cook popcorn, protect your plants, cover your children’s text books, make puppets, or construct luminaries, and that’s just a small list. Some people have taken reusing paper bags to the next level.

Paper Bag Stairs

Rachel Evans’ staircase is one of a kind. Upon first inspection you might imagine that they are made of either cork or burled wood, but look very close and you might just notice that they’re MDF covered with stained brown paper.

Of course, you probably wouldn’t guess that real wood hadn’t been used. This inexpensive solution made the treads look totally authentic, and Rachel did it all using just the brown craft paper from which paper bags are made, white glue, dark walnut stain, and floor-grade polyurethane semi-gloss.

Paper Bag Lamp Shades

Perhaps not quite as striking as Evans’ paper bag stairs, one homeowner decided to do something a little more immediately arresting. When you turn a lamp on in their house, you’ll find yourself bathed in the warm, homely glow produced by light filtering through a paper bag.

Folded cleverly around and they attached at each end, the paper bag lamp shade looks great even when the lamp is off. Turn it on, and something usually seen as drab becomes something completely out of the ordinary.

Paper Bag Wall

A man named Duane posted something similarly eye-catching on popular creative site Cottage in the Oaks. Duane reported that he have saved up every square inch of wrapping paper and decorative paper bags for years. Once he felt like he had enough, he began to wallpaper his foyer with them.

 The result is a fascinating patchwork construction of corporate logos, strikingly patterned wrapping, and odd bits and pieces which would otherwise have been long forgotten. Each piece was stuck down to a patch of wall covered in wet paint. They were then smoothed out and covered in a water-based sealer.

 

Of course, you don’t have to take things that far, but it’s always fascinating to hear about those who have done so. 


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